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The CrossFit stimulus—constantly varied high-intensity functional movement coupled with meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch, and no sugar—prepares you for the demands of a healthy, functional, independent life and provides a hedge against chronic disease and incapacity. This stimulus is elegant in the mathematical sense of being marked by simplicity and efficacy. The proven elements of this broad, general, and inclusive fitness, in terms of both movement and nutrition, are what we term our CrossFit Essentials.

In this exclusive preview of Gary Taubes’ new book, Taubes explains why most of us have a fraught relationship with food and a flawed understanding of what makes a healthy diet. Here Taubes argues, “The existing evidence says that if you have metabolic syndrome, if you’re getting fatter or are already obese, if you’re prediabetic or already diabetic, avoiding carbohydrate-rich foods and replacing them with fat may be the single healthiest thing you can do for yourself." He adds: "No one can guarantee what happens in the long run. … Anyone who makes an ironclad guarantee for any way of eating—that one diet will assuredly make you live longer than others ... is probably selling something."

Read MoreThe Case for Keto — Exclusive Preview #4

In this exclusive preview of Gary Taubes’ new book, Taubes explains why most of us have a fraught relationship with food and a flawed understanding of what makes a healthy diet. In 2002, Taubes discussed recent research findings on the relative benefits of a low-carb, high-fat diet in an article in New York Times Magazine. Since then, he writes, “close to one hundred, if not more, clinical trials have published results, and they confirm these observations with remarkable consistency. The trials are still incapable of telling us whether embracing LCHF/ketogenic eating will extend our lives (compared to other patterns of eating the authorities might recommend), but they continue to challenge, relentlessly, the conventional thinking on the dangers of high-fat diets, and they tell us that in the short term, this way of eating is safe and beneficial.”

Read MoreThe Case for Keto — Exclusive Preview #3

In this exclusive preview of Gary Taubes’ new book, Taubes explains why most of us have a fraught relationship with food and a flawed understanding of what makes a healthy diet. “‘Is it safe?’ is always one of two ultimate questions when considering a change of diet or lifestyle, particularly with the goal of preventing chronic disease,” Taubes writes. Is a ketogenic diet safe? Is a plant-based diet safe? Is saturated fat dangerous? Here Taubes evaluates the various methods we have for answering these questions, from personal experience and anecdotal evidence to clinical trials.

Read MoreThe Case for Keto — Exclusive Preview #2

In this exclusive preview of Gary Taubes’ new book, Taubes explains why most of us have a fraught relationship with food and a flawed understanding of what makes a healthy diet. “Despite all my reporting and my journalistic skepticism, my thoughts on the nature of a healthy diet were a product of the nutritional belief system” rather than scientific evidence, Taubes writes. In this excerpt, he describes how he has come to think about health and diet trends in more recent years and shares his recommendations for navigating continually evolving nutrition advice.

Read MoreThe Case for Keto — Exclusive Preview #1

Whole, unprocessed carbohydrate sources have significant health and performance benefits that might go unnoticed with macronutrient counting. For example, a doughnut and an orange can both provide the carbohydrate grams one needs, but other constituents should be considered. Even honey has more health value compared to table sugar due to the vitamins and minerals it contains.

Read More Carbohydrate Selections: The Right Carb for the Right Job

Training and nutrition are the two most powerful mechanisms for improving human health, but they exert their influence from opposite directions. Diet supplies energy and is the source of the body’s structural components. Exercise consumes energy and actually breaks down the body in various ways. Here, Tyler Hass explores how to optimize both mechanisms by dialing the body’s activity and nutrition patterns up or down.

Read MoreMake Every Calorie Count: Dialing in Nutrition and Exercise

Many dieters believe a calorie is a calorie and operating at a calorie deficit is the key to weight loss. However, counting calories is an ineffective and often unhealthy diet method. The body processes calories from different sources in different ways, and assuming all calories are equal often leads to overconsumption of refined carbohydrates. Tyler Hass explains why eating high-quality foods and exercising with high intensity is the most effective way to drive favorable changes in body composition.

Read MoreWeighing the Evidence for Calorie Counting

What we eat (quality), how much we eat (quantity), and when we eat (chrononutrition) all affect our health and performance. However, compared to the other two factors, chrononutrition is arguably the weakest of the three. In this installment of his series on meal timing, Tyler Hass explains why clever timing schemes are not a silver bullet and should be understood as a means to squeeze that last 5-10% of optimization out of a good diet and exercise program.

Read MoreMeal Timing: When Should We Eat?

Is breakfast the most important meal of the day? Do late-night snacks lead to weight gain? Tyler Hass examines common myths about meal timing and explains which are supported by the scientific literature and which have been debunked. He also describes the relationship between circadian rhythm and metabolism.

Read MoreMeal Timing: Chrononutrition