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“The needs of our olympic athletes and grandparents differ by degree, not kind.” That is to say, everyone needs to perform an intelligently selected variety of functional movements at a level of intensity appropriate for that individual. Everyone needs to eat food that sustains, rather than harms, the body. This is the pursuit of fitness, and the ability to maintain that fitness throughout your life is a defining measure of health. CrossFit At Home is a place to access the necessary tools—functional movement, simple nourishment—to sustain and preserve your health at home.

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“Patrick Zeiher, owner of CrossFit Indian Trail, notes that one reason CrossFit is so beneficial for all ages is that the physical needs of a person vary by degree — not by kind. ‘We can literally have a 60-year-old athlete doing a similar variation of a workout as a 25-year-old competitive athlete,’ he says. ‘Their needs don't vary by kind; in other words, they both need to be able to squat to a toilet, pick something up off the floor, or get themselves off the floor.’”

Read the article What is CrossFit? And is it right for you? Here's what you need to know

"Hereditary and relatively common, polycystic kidney disease (PKD) has long been thought to be progressive and irreversible, condemning its sufferers to a long, slow and often painful decline as fluid filled cysts develop in the kidneys, grow and eventually rob the organs of their function. Progress toward finding a cure has been sluggish, with only one drug proven to slow — but not stop — the progression of PKD. But now, thanks to research conducted by a UC Santa Barbara team, a solution may be no farther than the end of your fork. Diet, they discovered, could hold the key to treating PKD. … Ketosis, the underlying metabolic state of popular diets such as the ketogenic diet, and, to a lesser extent, time-restricted feeding (a form of intermittent fasting), has been shown in the group’s studies to stall and even reverse PKD."

Read the article Hope on the Horizon: researchers find method to potentially stop and reverse polycystic kidney disease

In this 2012 article, Gary Taubes and Cristin Kearns Couzens review the history of the sugar industry’s attempts to dismiss or conceal the troubling health claims linking their products to rising rates of diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic diseases. In a “decades-long effort to stack the scientific deck,” the Sugar Association, its spin-off International Sugar Research Foundation, and “contributing research members” from companies such as Coca-Cola, Hershey’s, and Nabisco poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into research grants and studies designed, as internal documents put it, “to maintain research as a main prop of the industry’s defense.” As the authors describe, these efforts — and an extensive series of public relations campaigns — rewarded the sugar industry with a profound degree of influence over nutrition guidelines, the official recommendations of groups such as the American Diabetes Association, and the general public’s understanding of nutrition.

Read the article Big Sugar's Sweet Little Lies

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