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CrossFit Health is an investigation into the ills of modern medicine and the wilful abuse of the public’s trust in science. The lessons learned from the legal dismantling of fake science, a crooked journal, and perjuring scientists have given us a forensic view as to how everything might have gone so wrong. We’re calling the combination of runaway medical costs and disease rates — which many profit from but none combat effectively — “The Mess.”

“American taxpayers spend $30 billion annually funding biomedical research. By some estimates, half of the results from these studies can’t be replicated elsewhere — the science is simply wrong. Often, research institutes and academia emphasize publishing results over getting the right answers, incentivizing poor experimental design, improper methods, and sloppy statistics. Bad science doesn’t just hold back medical progress, it can sign the equivalent of a death sentence. ... In Rigor Mortis, award-winning science journalist Richard F. Harris reveals these urgent issues with vivid anecdotes, personal stories, and interviews with the nation’s top biomedical researchers. We need to fix our dysfunctional biomedical system — now.”

Read MoreRigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions

Cristin Kearns was managing dental clinics for Kaiser and researching the link between gum disease and Type 2 diabetes when she came across a brochure with the CDC’s dietary recommendations for diabetics. The bad advice she found in the brochure forever altered the trajectory of her career and led to her development of a large digital archive — a record of instances in which the Sugar Association, a 501(c)6 formerly known as the Sugar Research Foundation (SRF), used public relations campaigns and industry funding to influence scientific research, education, and public policy in support of its mission to promote sugar consumption.

Watch How Big Sugar Influences Nutrition Science: A First Glimpse at Sugar Industry Documents

In September 2019, "The Chair of the British Parliament Science and Technology Committee, Sir Norman Lamb MP made calls for a full investigation into cholesterol lowering statin drugs. It was instigated after a letter was written to him signed by a number of eminent international doctors including the editor of the BMJ, the Past President of the Royal College of Physicians and the Director of the Centre of Evidence Based Medicine in Brazil wrote a letter calling for a full parliamentary inquiry into the controversial medication. Here, lead author Cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra makes the case for [why] there’s an urgent need for such an investigation."

Read the articleDo statins really work? Who benefits? Who has the power to cover up the side effects?

“There seems to be a prevalent idea that cholesterol is a wholly undesirable substance. It should be pointed out that it is an essential constituent of all animal tissues and undoubtedly plays an important role in the normal function of all cells. To eliminate cholesterol from the diet means the elimination of animal foods from the diet — meats, milk, eggs, etc. These are the protective foods which nutritionists have clearly shown are essential for an adequate diet. … The proposition that low cholesterol diets be used as a preventive for the development of atherosclerosis would mean that animal foods be omitted from our diets. This is equivalent to the negation of practically all that nutrition science has taught us in the past. Such a course may well be disastrous.”

Read the editorialComments on Cholesterol: D. M. Hegsted, G. V. Mann, F. J. Stare, and Lewis J. Moorman in 1952

Maryanne Demasi, an investigative journalist with a Ph.D. in rheumatology, shares highlights from her interview with Danish physician Uffe Ravnskov. Ravnskov, a famed cholesterol skeptic, has gained worldwide significance for his persistent fight against the demonization of cholesterol. Though he once believed additional research would “out the absurdity of a narrative that cast saturated fats and cholesterol as dietary villains,” he has since become an active crusader against misinformation and the corruption of science, publishing more than a hundred articles in well-known scientific journals in an effort to set the record straight on cholesterol.

Read MoreIn Conversation with Uffe Ravnskov

In this talk at CrossFit’s 2017 Health Conference, Australian orthopedic surgeon Dr. Gary Fettke presents a history of the junk science behind prevailing nutrition guidelines. Fettke has come under attack for his critique of the mainstream: Because of his dietary recommendations (“low-carb, healthy fat”), Fettke was reported to Australia’s medical board. But “the message is too important to be silenced,” Fettke states. “I feel that the combination of fructose, refined carbohydrate, and polyunsaturated oils is toxic, inflammatory, and at the root cause of all disease that we look at.”

Watch Dr. Gary Fettke: The Role of Nutrition in Everything

Dr. Zoë Harcombe has become an expert in the corruption and error plaguing the health sciences — a dire situation that she, like CrossFit Founder Greg Glassman, refers to as “The Mess.” Harcombe defines “The Mess” as “the escalating disease (and) the escalating medical costs, which many people are profiting from but none are combatting effectively.” During a presentation delivered on July 31 at the 2019 CrossFit Health Conference, Harcombe outlined many factors that contribute to this growing problem — specifically, the role of dietitians and the food and beverage industry in influencing how and what we eat, accreditation that regulates who can offer dietary advice, and the disparity between what we are told to eat and what the evidence suggests we should eat.

Watch Dr. Zoë Harcombe on the Mess: The Money Vs. the Evidence

Commercial interests have discovered numerous ways to co-opt the loyalty of health professionals to promote company-sponsored studies and marketing messages. Here, Dr. Maryanne Demasi describes just a few of the indications that Australia’s National Heart Foundation (NHF) has sold its soul to industry. She focuses specifically on the NHF’s ties to junk food and pharmaceutical companies, citing responses from various scholars who have expressed deep concern over how the NHF’s receipt of industry funding might threaten public health.

Read MoreHas the Australian NHF Sold Its Soul?

Dr. Jason Fung, MD, is a nephrologist and expert in the use of intermittent fasting and low-carbohydrate diets for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. In this presentation, delivered on Aug. 2, 2018, at the 2018 CrossFit Health Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, Fung shares his first-hand experiences with “The Mess” in the medical sciences and discusses how he shifted his research and clinical practices as a result of those experiences. He explains why long-term weight loss is so difficult, introduces the concept of therapeutic fasting, and dispels common myths associated with the fasting process.

WatchDr. Jason Fung: Fasting as a Therapeutic Option for Weight Loss

“Most people let their doctor make the decisions for them, but the evidence tells us that we should be cautious,” Professor Peter C. Gøtzsche explains. Gøtzsche, a specialist in internal medicine, also recommends avoiding medications whenever possible. “We live in a world that is so overdiagnosed and overtreated that in high-income countries, our medications are the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer,” he observes.

Read More”Trust me, I’m a doctor”

“Framingham investigators seemed to be objective in their early reports but subsequently exhibited stronger and stronger biases. The use of such terms as ‘powerful’ to describe an exceedingly weak relationship has been commonplace. One kind of bias exhibited was the process of reinterpreting data in order to be consistent with the current position of the alliance (the group providing the funding; i.e., the NHLBI).” —Russell Smith

Read MoreThe Framingham Heart Study, Part 3: Framingham’s Presentational Flaws—Bias or Fraud?

“The Framingham Heart Study laid the groundwork for the obsession we’ve had with cholesterol and saturated fat and may well be the study that has been most damaging to the health of the U.S. population. This damage comes not necessarily from the study’s data but from the misreporting, deception, dissembling and outright prevarication about the data that have made it the wellspring for both the diabetes and obesity epidemics that afflict us.” —Dr. Michael Eades

Read MoreThe Framingham Heart Study, Part 1: Cargo Cult Science

Life expectancy increased as countries spent more on health care from 1970 to 2015. The United States stands out as the greatest spender by far, but despite health-care spending in the trillions, Americans can expect to live shorter lives than citizens of countries that spend less on health. The data suggests the U.S. health-care system is increasingly inefficient at best and completely broken at worst.

Read MoreLINK BETWEEN HEALTH SPENDING AND LIFE EXPECTANCY: U.S. IS AN OUTLIER

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