Tripping Over the Truth

67
ByTravis ChristoffersonMarch 1, 2020

Read Tripping Over the Truth, by Travis Christofferson.

From the publisher (Chelsea Green, 2017 ed.):

A masterful synchronization of history and cutting-edge science shines new light on humanity’s darkest diagnosis.

In the wake of the Cancer Genome Atlas project’s failure to provide a legible roadmap to a cure for cancer, science writer Travis Christofferson illuminates a promising blend of old and new perspectives on the disease. Tripping Over the Truth follows the story of cancer’s proposed metabolic origin from the vaunted halls of the German scientific golden age to modern laboratories around the world. The reader is taken on a journey through time and science that results in an unlikely connecting of the dots with profound therapeutic implications.

Transporting us on a rich narrative of humanity’s struggle to understand the cellular events that conspire to form malignancy, Tripping Over the Truth reads like a detective novel, full of twists and cover-ups, blind-alleys and striking moments of discovery by men and women with uncommon vision, grit, and fortitude. Ultimately, Christofferson arrives at a conclusion that challenges everything we thought we knew about the disease, suggesting the reason for the failed war against cancer stems from a flawed paradigm that categorizes cancer as an exclusively genetic disease.

For anyone affected by this terrifying disease and the physicians who struggle to treat it, this book provides a fresh and hopeful perspective. It explores the new and exciting non-toxic therapies born from the emerging metabolic theory of cancer. These therapies may one day prove to be a turning point in the struggle against our ancient enemy. We are shown how the metabolic theory redraws the battle map, directing researchers to approach cancer treatment from a different angle, framing it more like a gentle rehabilitation rather than all-out combat. In a sharp departure from the current “targeted” revolution occurring in cancer pharmaceuticals, the metabolic therapies highlighted have one striking feature that sets them apart ― the potential to treat all types of cancer because they exploit the one weakness that is common to every cancer cell: dysfunctional metabolism.

Post thoughts to comments.


Join us next month for a discussion of The Obesity Code, by Dr. Jason Fung.

Comments on Tripping Over the Truth

67 Comments

Comment thread URL copied!
Back to 200302
Carmen Casteling
November 18th, 2021 at 10:39 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This book was very close to home, as it is for many others. My father has been the only survivor of cancer in our family, his brother died of it, his father and many before. It is a horrible thing. Growing up it was terrible to see my family suffer. 



I know very little about what actually happens in the body when someone has cancer, other than it starts with a Malignant tumor, so it was very interesting to read what the cancer actually does to the body. Such as, “The cell’s ability to generate energy through the oxidative pathway is damaged, and the cell reverts to fermentation.” (p. 19). It was also interesting to learn and read how chemotherapy came about, the studies done on it, the medicine that is used (such as 3BP, Nexavar, Herceptin) and that cancer is a metabolic disease. 



I am a firm believer of health in all attributes of your life- mental, physical, emotional, etc. As a coach, I feel the most effective method is to show your emotional support, share the knowledge of this book, and give steps for any practical application (such as help to point them in the right direction, give advice for a cleaner, healthier lifestyle). Eating healthy definitely has its factors here when speaking about lowering the risk of cancer, and studies have shown great success from the removal of sugar when cancer/tumors are present! 



When thinking of cancer, I feel much more research is needed, and funding needs to be provided for this to happen. As this book explains, a lot of funds and time needs to go into the research in order for the scientists to truly figure out how to help cancer patients, so big corporations need to play their part in giving back to the community- and help this research take place. People can play their part to improve their own lives in the healthiest way possible, by adding in exercise and nutritious foods in order to try lower the risk of cancer.



The final take away from reading this book is that it’s a must read for sure! I really like how this book was written! It is based on science, but it allows people to understand the facts and what happened, by including real-life stories that they can relate to.  

Comment URL copied!
Garvin Yu
November 4th, 2021 at 7:13 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

My biggest takeaway from reading this informative book is

the fact of how little current society knows about the origin, formation,

progression, and treatment modalities of the many different cancers that are

inflicting people every single day.  No

matter the advanced technologies of current day, little is known about these

cancers especially with the limited funding available to scientists, doctors,

and researchers. To add to the problem of limited funds, there are numerous

forms of different cancers that are very different from one another and

requires different research in order to develop treatment modalities.

 


Throughout my very limited knowledge of cancer research,

I’ve noticed a lot of contradicting viewpoints with all of them still being

backed up by legitimate research and studies.


 


In chapter 1, the author writes about researcher Percival

Pott who had a theory that chimney boys who were constantly exposed to soot

from their jobs was causing them to develop cancer at a much higher rate than

people who were not exposed to such carcinogens.  This was the first time that anyone theorized

external environment was the cause and responsible for cancer development in

otherwise healthy humans.  This became

known as the somatic mutation theory.  At

the time, they did not know what cancer was specifically, but that people were

getting sick and dying from an unknown disease. 

In 1821 Rudolf Virchow discovered that the pathology of cancer was

uncontrolled cellular reproduction which caused many ill side effects and

caused the host organism to become ill and wreaked havoc on their body systems.

 


However, in chapter 7 of Tripping Over The Truth, the

author writes about the research of Otto Warburg who was awarded  the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1931.  Warburg concluded and believed that the root

cause of cancer caused by the organism’s energy.  He researched that the increase in cancerous

cells was no caused by aerobic respiration, as previously thought, but by

fermentation in the presence of oxygen. 

This became known as the “Warburg effect”.  Later in his research, he found that when

healthy cells are deprived of oxygen for a few hours, as is the case in aerobic

respiration, they became cancerous.  This

theory points towards the origins of cancer cells being caused by dysfunctional

cellular respiration.

 


It’s very telling of how little we know about the

different cancers and how they are formed so that we can develop modalities to

prevent it from forming, or at least stop its spread.  The 2 theories above contradict each other,

but in actuality they may both be correct and have a basis of truth. Maybe the

root cause is genetic, but external environment factors accelerate cancer’s growth

and spread. In the fire service as a whole, many fire departments have adopted

the somatic mutation theory in which external environment is a root cause of

cancers.  Firefighters in general have a

higher rate of cancer compared to the rest of the population, and it is

believed to be caused by the carcinogens present in house fires, car fires, and

many other hazardous environments.  Some

departments have taken even a further step and instituted SOPs/SOGs for “clean

cabs” in which fire gear is not stored inside of the cab of the fire apparatus.  However, this can cause a delay in operational

response.

 


The final takeaway from reading this book and thinking of

cancer in general, is that much more joint cooperative research is needed, and

funding should be provided for the research. 

It is also my belief that major pharmaceutical companies are a huge part

of the blame for limited cancer research, knowledge, and treatment since they

want their costly drugs to be pushed for patients for lengthy periods.  However, this is a whole new discussion that

is not a part of this book.

Comment URL copied!
Garvin Yu
November 2nd, 2021 at 1:39 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

My biggest takeaway from reading this informative book is

the fact of how little current society knows about the origin, formation,

progression, and treatment modalities of the many different cancers that are

inflicting people every single day.  No

matter the advanced technologies of current day, little is known about these

cancers especially with the limited funding available to scientists, doctors,

and researchers. To add to the problem of limited funds, there are numerous

forms of different cancers that are very different from one another and

requires different research in order to develop treatment modalities.

 


Throughout my very limited knowledge of cancer research,

I’ve noticed a lot of contradicting viewpoints with all of them still being

backed up by legitimate research and studies.


 


In chapter 1, the author writes about researcher Percival

Pott who had a theory that chimney boys who were constantly exposed to soot

from their jobs was causing them to develop cancer at a much higher rate than

people who were not exposed to such carcinogens.  This was the first time that anyone theorized

external environment was the cause and responsible for cancer development in

otherwise healthy humans.  This became

known as the somatic mutation theory.  At

the time, they did not know what cancer was specifically, but that people were

getting sick and dying from an unknown disease. 

In 1821 Rudolf Virchow discovered that the pathology of cancer was

uncontrolled cellular reproduction which caused many ill side effects and

caused the host organism to become ill and wreaked havoc on their body systems.

 


However, in chapter 7 of Tripping Over The Truth, the

author writes about the research of Otto Warburg who was awarded  the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1931.  Warburg concluded and believed that the root

cause of cancer caused by the organism’s energy.  He researched that the increase in cancerous

cells was no caused by aerobic respiration, as previously thought, but by

fermentation in the presence of oxygen. 

This became known as the “Warburg effect”.  Later in his research, he found that when

healthy cells are deprived of oxygen for a few hours, as is the case in aerobic

respiration, they became cancerous.  This

theory points towards the origins of cancer cells being caused by dysfunctional

cellular respiration.

 


It’s very telling of how little we know about the

different cancers and how they are formed so that we can develop modalities to

prevent it from forming, or at least stop its spread.  The 2 theories above contradict each other,

but in actuality they may both be correct and have a basis of truth. Maybe the

root cause is genetic, but external environment factors accelerate cancer’s growth

and spread. In the fire service as a whole, many fire departments have adopted

the somatic mutation theory in which external environment is a root cause of

cancers.  Firefighters in general have a

higher rate of cancer compared to the rest of the population, and it is

believed to be caused by the carcinogens present in house fires, car fires, and

many other hazardous environments.  Some

departments have taken even a further step and instituted SOPs/SOGs for “clean

cabs” in which fire gear is not stored inside of the cab of the fire apparatus.  However, this can cause a delay in operational

response.

 


The final takeaway from reading this book and thinking of

cancer in general, is that much more joint cooperative research is needed, and

funding should be provided for the research. 

It is also my belief that major pharmaceutical companies are a huge part

of the blame for limited cancer research, knowledge, and treatment since they

want their costly drugs to be pushed for patients for lengthy periods.  However, this is a whole new discussion that

is not a part of this book.

Comment URL copied!
Jason Rice
October 14th, 2021 at 1:48 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I chose this book as my stepmother faced down cancer over a

decade ago, and she has nothing but regrets about her decision to undergo the onslaught

of chemical treatments that tore down her body. In the end, she was able to

defeat cancer; however, she continues to have ongoing complications as a result.


This book does a great job outlining the history of cancer

and cancer research. It was difficult to follow at times, but it was interesting

to learn about the complexity of cancer. For it to completely stump the greatest

scientists in the world again and again is truly remarkable, especially given

how well funded cancer research has been. Just as a cure seemed to be right around

the corner, cancer threw a curveball and turned all understanding upside down.


The part that stands out to me the most was when I learned

that the lack of food essentially starves a cancer cell. A starving cancer cell

is basically unable to grow. It’s sad to think about how the early cancer

patients underwent terrible side effects from the chemotherapy trials. One of

those side effects was lack of appetite, and it was quite possibly that lack of

appetite that created a false positive that the cancer drug was actually working.

All along it could have simply been the result of the starvation.


In the end, I want to believe that cancer patients can come out

of treatment healthier than when they went in as proposed by Seyfried. The

thought that cancer can first be addressed through R-KD is something we can do

for free, and it is something that I’m looking forward to learning more about. I

hope the research continues to support the overall summary of this book that

cancer is metabolic and not genetic. However, I’m not optimistic that it will any

time soon as politics and money will likely continue to get in the way.

Comment URL copied!
Bill Grundler
October 12th, 2021 at 1:28 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Im a fan of origin stories and this was one that held my interest for sure. I lost my father to brain cancer. He was one of the healthiest individuals I have ever known so it seemed so wrong that he would be taken by cancer. So it was very interesting seeing the theories that were laid out in this book.


Starting with the history of cancer research and the HOW things were found blew me away. They way we have come across so many scientific and biologic finding in our history through complete accident is unreal! I loved how Christopherson was able to go through many of the early researchers and scientists that found cancer cells, how they responded to different environments and how different actions would force these cancers cells to thrive or to die. It's a very optimistic feeling as you read about them pushing and driving toward slimming these cancers from our lives.  


Then it all changes.


With the researchers getting a “few” good results, the perspective becomes a one-dimensional view of how to attack cancer due to it being a genetic issue. Radiation is THE way. Sure it can kill cancer but also kills us at the same time. A terrible race to the finish.  And just like view we used to have on how great and important “breads” are for our health from our medical and nutritional agencies, we are now told the “only” way to fight cancer is through radiation. But then studies of Keto and hyperbaric oxygen therapy seem to show positive results. So how do we take them? Are they powerful enough, dramatic enough as radiation? It almost seems too simple. But then THIS exact thing is what CrossFit and Crossfit trainers have come to live by. However, simple isn’t easy.


Here we are as Crossfit coaches, leading our members with preventative and proactive information about how to improve their health and fitness through nutrition and movement. And from the finding, the idea that cancer can be controlled by diet by removing the cancer cell's fuel sources, ie glucose, which will stop the cancer cells from multiplying and growing sounds like such an easy action. The difficult part is that it’s easy to say when you don’t have cancer. It’s different when you are faced with having to deal with it and death. Cancer has mortality connected to it. But this really makes me want to push even harder and louder the idea of PROACTIVE protection through proper nutrition. We have to do this BEFORE rather than once we are ridded with cancer cells. Sure, there are many drug interventions and actions out there that have been found over the years, but the one that seems to keeps showing up, and is the least evasive is diet and nutrition. No it might not be a cure-all necessarily, but seems to be the best and longest reaching protection.  


This book gives a great history, gives many scary “false” findings, and puts a fire under your ass to be as healthy (nutritionally speaking) as possible. A must read for sure!

Comment URL copied!
Matthias Turner
July 27th, 2021 at 4:05 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping Over The Truth by Travis Christofferson hit home as most like others… I have had family members and friends affected by cancer! 

One of the biggest standout points Christofferson pushes in this book is that Cancer is a metabolic disease/mitochondrial issue. This means that a lot of the medical approaches are not effective… Or more so just another bandaid to the solution. 


I find it mind-boggling that a lot of the scientific world still look at Cancer as a purely genetic disease… As Christofferson states this is a one-directional view. And, unfortunately, isn’t taking us closer to finding a cure.


The statistics alone are pretty scary with 14 million people being diagnosed with cancer each year at the moment. Which is expected to increase to 24 million (close to the population of Australia - where I live) by 2035. 


I had never heard the story of how chemotherapy was created… This was mind-blowing to me! (Nitrogen mustard) 


Now onto the positives! 

The thought that cancer is a metabolic disease makes a lot of sense to me! I have often heard of people “miraculously” reducing or ridding themselves of cancers and tumours through fasting and ketogenic diets! 

Studies have shown great success from the removal of sugar when cancer/tumours are present!


I think knowing this as a coach, my approach will not be to push this information onto individuals who have cancer (or family members who have cancer)… But in fact, offer a quick synopsis of the book followed by sharing the book with them… Of course, offering my help after they have read the book!  


Unfortunately, I’ve had my own family shy away from nutritional help when suffering from cancer… Until they read from other sources that it could be a major contributor! 


Being that in the coach-client situation you are usually the respected individually whose almost every word is taken onboard… It may be a different outcome. However, I feel the most effective method is to offer firstly your emotional support > Share the knowledge of the book and the book > followed by practical application (or help to point them in the right direction for this to happen.


As Christofferson points out… Everybody’s cancer is unique to them. The future of cancer research and medications are uncertain! The thought that cancer could be a metabolic disease is promising… Despite the complexities that cancer keeps throwing at us!

Comment URL copied!
Deane Ketzner
July 4th, 2021 at 3:01 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping over the truth takes you on a medico-historical journey through the ages of cancer research and development. Travis seeks to compare and explain this horrific illness through a possible metabolic lens, as opposed to the usual genetic point of view, both of which produce vastly different outcomes. Drawing on various methods of research, and investigation of his own, he does not simply state that what he says is fact – he acknowledges that as a proponent of fighting cancer metabolically, this has had its fair share of scientific criticism, but he provides a persuasive argument in its favour. 

What is distinctive about this book is the way in which it is written – it is largely based on science, but the message is conveyed in a manner allowing lay people to understand the argument, by including real-life stories that many can relate to. Some may call the metabolic theory controversial, as it does not fit the ‘socially-accepted genetic mould’, while others may see it as an avenue worth pursuing. 

Most cancer research is focused on targeting the specific type of cancer needing treatment, which is how the genetic approach is largely implemented. What this book brings forward, is the possibility of ‘general’ treatment, by targeting the root cause of fragmented or damaged cells, being a debilitated metabolism. This highlights the danger of conducting research through a one-dimensional sphere and supports the argument that a more holistic, metabolism-based approach to fighting cancer should be embarked upon. Travis’s argument further entirely supports the fact that sugar is extremely damaging and its effects may be more extreme than people think, especially with respect to cancer. 

The question we are left asking is whether cancer should actually only be considered a genetic disease, or if the scientific conclusion that it is metabolic is more viable. Due to this question and conflicting scientific views, the development of cancer treatment has been extremely gradual. However, as science has advanced over the years, so has the one-dimensional perception of many scientists, who are now open to questioning the underlying cause of cancer, namely whether it is entirely genetic, or whether it is metabolic. As the metabolic theory becomes increasingly prominent, so do the inconsistencies of the genetic theory, and the acknowledgment by genetic proponents that cancer is extremely more complex than any scientist could ever explain. It is due to this complexity that it cannot be said which theory is correct. As Christofferson said, theories rise and fall. What can however be said with sufficient certainty, is that nobody can predict the future of cancer treatment. 


Comment URL copied!
errol clark
May 31st, 2021 at 5:09 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Where to begin… 


This book couldn’t have fallen into my hands at a better time in life. Two of my greatest role models were recently diagnosed with cancer. One being my father, the other my wife’s uncle. After reading many of the comments below, I’m clearly not alone. Whether personally or through connection to loved ones, we will all be affected by cancer at some point in our lives. “...cancer will, indeed, be the new normal -- an inevitability.”  - Mukherjee (pg179)


Regarding the book, I’m not sure that I can add value from what has already been stated below. 


In attempt to do so otherwise, I thought it might be helpful to provide some resources that I discovered through reading the book: 


Anyone affected by Prostate Cancer, please have a read over this study; Ketogenic Diet and Prostate Cancer Surveillance Pilot 


https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03194516?term=Ketogenic&cond=Prostate+Cancer&draw=2&rank=1


I took away two important findings from it:

  1. Some candidates with prostate cancer might want to consider active surveillance combined with an R-KD prior to undergoing conventional treatment options
  2. a 50% increased risk of pathologic progression was associated with every 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI over 25. In other words, lowering of BMI could be hugely beneficial (I know that BMI isn’t the best predictor of metabolic health but I’m certain we all understand the implications of this statement).


Additionally, this study is currently listed as “recruiting” if you know anyone that fits the criterion for prostate cancer: 


https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03679260?term=Ketogenic&cond=Prostate+Cancer&draw=2&rank=3 


Here is a great resource for those looking to start on R-KD https://charliefoundation.org/ 


Of all things, Tripping Over the Truth instilled hope. I’m hopeful that the metabolic theory of cancer will continue to gain further recognition. I’m hopeful that combination therapies will be proven highly effective with time. I’m hopeful that practicing physicians will begin to take more chances. And I’m hopeful that funding will be acquired for the many promising options of low cost therapeutic interventions that are spoken of. (It almost seems disgusting to me that the 3 million needed for 3BP and additional 3 million for RKD and HBOT hadn't been granted during the writing of this book). 


Additionally, the book reaffirmed my bias towards the importance of preventative healthcare. Looking at cancer from the SMT really paints a dark picture. TCGA was supposedly the final destination, instead, millions of targets emerged and the likelihood of a silver bullet drug has all but disappeared. This is all the more reason to encourage lifestyle interventions.


I also wanted to state that I found the read absolutely fascinating, almost poetic at times. Travis Christofferson did an amazing job of painting a picture in my mind. I could clearly envision the many scientists referenced in the book. Warburg, Pederson, Ko, D’agostino, Seyfried, and Watson all hold heroic stature in my mind. Each with a unique story, from Ko’s relentless pursuits and struggles, to Waton’s bravery in stating that cancer research should go away from genetics and towards metabolism.


An amazing book. I’ll be sharing this with as many people as I can.


Comment URL copied!
Alexander Mercieca
May 12th, 2021 at 2:50 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

The book, Tripping Over The Truth, was an eye-opening experience for me to read and came to me at the right time because my wife was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer a few months before I started reading this book. The studies cited in the book regarding HER2 negative and positive as well as the information provided about PET scans and hexokinase II (p. 101), among others, really helped me understand what was going on a lot better. Also, the book made several connections to my daughter who was diagnosed with neuroblastoma a few years earlier and was on methotrexate after the removal of her tumor. I learned that, “In 1947 methotrexate was founded by Harvard pathologist Sidney Farber” (p.38). My daughter was also treated at St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, which as the book states, Donald Pinkel opened in 1962 in Memphis (p. 47). One major theme of the book was the Warburg effect and how

cancer was dependent upon sugars to feed it to grow, making diet changes a very easy start to help slow or even prevent the spread or severity of cancer, the “defective metabolism” (p. 17).  I found it very mind boggling how the quest for funding and the incentives by those who provided it skewed research to produce outcomes which benefitted the benefactors. The studies that were not able to be replicated shows a very serious issue with the for-profit motive placed on the American healthcare system.

The section which I further researched was related to the copious amounts of published studies citing the documented studies which used an incorrectly labeled cancer, melanoma, which was thought to be breast cancer.  I found it very interesting all of the contradictory information which has been delivered to not only doctors but the public as well through published studies that were non-replicable. I plan on using some of this information with my clients at the gym to help them understand the importance of nutrition and how it forms the base in overall health. Some of the studies cited throughout this book seem a little too much to bring up for all clients, but will serve for a good foundation when discussing the importance of food selection and using it as a preventative medicine.

Comment URL copied!
Gavin Heselton
April 26th, 2021 at 6:46 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I found this book to reveal a remarkable knowledge gap in my understanding of cancer. Despite having trained to support cancer patients in a clinical dietetic setting; I actually found that I knew very little regarding the nature of cancer, it’s aetiology and treatment options. I thoroughly enjoyed being walked through the chronology of the study of cancer and the development of treatments and feel I have far greater understanding of the subject as a whole.


I had until now believed that cancer was the result of chromosomal damage from carcinogens or occurring as a facet of an aberrant genetic process – The Somatic Mutation Theory (SMT). This theory appears to be the layperson’s consensus understanding of the aetiology and it was refreshing to read the counterpoints of intertumoural and intratumoural heterogeneity (many different variants of genetic anomalies both within and between tumours in the same blanket cancer type i.e. breast cancer, hepatic cancer) as being incongruous with the basic premise of the accepted theory.


The metabolic theory of cancer is an exciting notion, particularly given the promising trial results of 3BP, ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy that at least appear to directly and profoundly disrupt oncogenesis. In this way, metabolic treatments of the disease appear to selectively affect cancer cells rather than using a more shotgun chemotherapeutic approach that affects all cells and leads to the devastating side effects that typify this ubiquitous approach.


I still have some outstanding questions regarding the process that precipitates the damage to the mitochondria – is cancer an inevitable part of aging as the mitochondria decline? What is it that precipitates this decline? Is it damage to mitochondria themselves; to the chromosomes that blueprint the mitochondria or some other process? Or all of the above?


The afterword, also quoted by Jon Gary in this thread, summarises:


“This is not a standoff between one theory and another. Nature is under no obligation to present cancer as a genetic disease or a metabolic disease exclusively. It may be the SMT of cancer and the metabolic theory are intertwined - a chimerical monster in two realms at once.”


I think, for now, this is both as informative and equally vague as we can determine. Many factors are involved in the development of cancer and to hang our hats on any single theory to inform treatment options is almost certainly going to be to the detriment of progress in this field.

Comment URL copied!
David Whitty
April 19th, 2021 at 11:31 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

My initial reaction to the early chapters of Travis Chirstofferson's book "Tripping over the truth" was of hope and marvel of how so many bright minds were drawn into cancer research. He writes it like mini-biographies, showing how these researchers came to be lured into the cancer world. The endless hours, exhaustive protocols and meticulous sessions the researchers spent in the development of understanding and befuddlement of cancer. Inspiring is the adjective that resonated with me when thinking of the commitment of these researchers.


The marvel of how the work of Warburg was then carried forward by Pederson, then eventually Seyfried and others. How giants stand on the shoulders of titans. Each career building toward the next generation's but the nemesis of cancer still always battling away.


Through the middle part of the book the frustration of researchers like Ko becomes almost palatable as obstacle after obstacle is thrown in their way.


The later part of book can create feelings of almost anger at the how profit and prestige get in the way of saving people.


It is over 20 years since my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer, thankfully she was an advocate for herself and had a PET scan within a few years of her surgery, if books like this can get into the hands of more trainers, the clients and families the ground swell of change continue.

Comment URL copied!
Mary Lathrop
March 13th, 2021 at 6:07 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping Over the Truth was written beautifully, however, while reading it I had a really hard time regulating my emotions! It made me excited for the scientific developments being made, but furious at the same time that people seemingly purposely were steered away from discovering real truths and effective treatments. Instead they were ridiculed, told it wasn't worth the investment, or pushed out of the project. How can people be so blind when such stunning information is put right in front of them?


I was intrigued by so much that was talked about in this book, with the first thing that really stuck out to me being the PET scan. I had heard of PET scans but never really knew the science behind it. The patient gets injected with a glucose-like compound and has to lay completely still for an hour while it moves through their body and absorbs into the cancer cells. After the hour, the patient is exposed to the detector which then causes the tumor to illuminate. The visualization of this and how the tumor basically gobbles up sugar as its fuel was so intriguing to me. It made me more interested in imaging as a whole.


The case studies discussed throughout this book were what next stuck out to me most. The human trial of 3BP done on Yvar Verhoeven had me on the edge of my seat. Reading about his degrade on other drugs and his progress with 3BP was incredible! To find out that he ended up dying from pneumonia was so sad. It would have been amazing to see how things continued to progress.


Then from there, reading about how R-KD shrank tumors and the statistical data of how it lengthened life was flooring, especially when combined with other therapies such as 3BP and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. I've been doing a lot of my continuing education on the nutrition aspect of fitness and previously was very skeptical of the keto diet, but the more and more that I've read, watched, and listened to, the more I'm just in awe of the health benefits that people get from it. I still have a hard time understand certain things, because there is always conflicting sides to every story, but when you read things like this that are backed with real scientific data, you can't just ignore it. I'm excited to keep learning more about it and how to do it safely so I can in turn give more guidance on it to people I know and work with.


I'm excited for what the future holds with research and kicking cancer in the butt once and for all! Progress, although often slow, is being made. I just continue to hope that all these scientists who are making these discoveries aren't continued to be sidelined or slowed down due to others' unbelief and/or lack of confidence or funding.

Comment URL copied!
Jason Yule
February 20th, 2021 at 1:05 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

‘Cancer, above all other diseases, has countless secondary causes. But, even for cancer, there is

only one prime cause."


The War on Cancer - or more aptly described - cancer's War on Us boils down to this one prime cause, according to Christofferson. This one prime cause is the fact that cancer cells are nothing more than ordinary cells that are able to utilize fermented sugars as energy. The truth of the matter is that Cancer is NOT at War with us, nor should we be at War with Cancer. The food industry, and specifically the sugar and the processed carbohydrate industry is the true culprit that should be the focus of our 100 Billion dollar per year efforts.


Without the fermented sugars these cancer cells are unable to thrive. By shifting the lens to which cancer is observed/studied/reviewed, etc, from genetic to metabolic, Christofferson argues we are able to understand cancer in a completely new light. He goes on to explain that through this metabolic lense, it's apparent that cancer cells originate from ordinary cells with damaged mitochondria. The damaged mitochondria lead to weird metabolism (utilizing glucose) and allows for the uncontrolled growth of the cancer.


However, he goes on to show that the damaged mitochondria are only an issue IF they have the necessary environment to survive - ie, fermented sugars. If they do not have the proper fuel their growth will be stalled or potentially even eliminated. This implies that the best way to fight cancer is not through poisonous drugs and chemicals but by starving the cancer from it's only energy source. By eliminating sugar from the diet we are able to stop cancer in its tracks.

Comment URL copied!
Ryno Verster
December 27th, 2020 at 2:55 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I would like to start off my comment by saying that I lost my dad in 2004 to Brain Cancer. He was first diagnosed with melanoma 5 years before his death that metastasized to his brain.


My personal life has therefore been impacted directly by the illusive, unrelenting and merciless disease we call cancer.


I have read all 52 comments previous to mine and will therefore try to add something that originates from experience with the book and relates to practicing as a CF-L3 professional.


To my benefit I have read The Complete guide to fasting that was written by Dr Jason Fung, the Warrior Diet by Ori Hofemekler, The Enzyme Factor by Hiromi Shinya and the Miracle of Fasting by Paul Bragg. These literatures provided with a precursor that made the material easy to digest and comprehend.


Being a CrossFit level 3 coach and Being a Specialized Nutritionist in practice discussing nutrition on a regular basis with my community, the most interesting and valuable part of the book, not taking away anything from the rest thereof, will focus on the health benefits of Fasting and The Ketogenic diet. Check out Diet Doctor.com for leading reachers like Dr Jason Fung on Fasting and Keto Diet.


My wife and I are both CrossFit Coaches and Affiliate owners and since 2016 we have fasted as prescribed by Paul Bragg. 7-10 days 4 times a year and 24-36 hours once a week.


Linking our lifestyle and knowledge of the three energy systems as described in the Level 1 Trainer guide really substantiated what we already practice and believe...... and that is Fasting acts like a natural chemotherapy to keep the body healthy and free from cancer.


Of most interest is the fact that fasting and keto starves cancer cells as it relies on glucose  as its energy source as explained in this book(Warburg theory of cancer, postulates that the driver of tumorigenesis is an insufficient cellular respiration caused by insult to mitochondria. ... In other words, instead of fully respiring in the presence of adequate oxygen, cancer cells ferment.)


Ot can then be understood that Cancer thrives on the second energy system our body uses, namely the Glycolic energy system.


As this literature states being in Ketosis is far more natural to humans than being in a fully junk food sugar filled fed state. In my opinion, the only way to prevent cancer is to live a life away from farming and industry and sadly this is not possible in todays life so the best next alternative is to use the bodies in-ate ability to heal itself through long term fasting supported by a balanced natural food, intermittent fasting and enzyme-filled dietary lifestyle. 


Additional note:

A frustrating part of human coexistence in life is depicted in this book showing how manipulative and selfish the scientific research industry really is.


It is a Shame that people dedicating their lives to their research like Dr. Young Ko is not given the necessary recognition and facilities to carry on their breakthrough discoveries in advancement of our fight against cancer but those with power go out of their way to suppress and silence these heroes.


I am glad to have found that she started her own company KoDiscovery where she carries on her research. Feel free to check out her website KoDiscovery.org.


A final note:

It is now more than ever important to captain our affiliate lifeboats so that we steer our community with a relentless passion to educate and inspire them to make the right preventative choices through fasting, diet and CrossFit excesses  to substantially increase our chances of aging healthfully.

Comment URL copied!
Oscar Isacsson
December 9th, 2020 at 2:14 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping Over the Truth


It’s been a while since covering the helixes, mitochondria, and all kinds of nerdy stuff from biology classes in school. Some parts of this topic can easily put you to sleep, however, I appreciate the author's effort of making it more digestible by weaving the dry material in with some fascinating medical/world history. 


There were many parts in this book that really stood out to me and a lot of this was the history of cancer treatment and how rough people had it back in the day. It’s so easy to get comfortable and complain about champagne problems. Reading about 5 year olds working to sweep chimneys makes all our daily tasks and WODs seem much easier and trivial. The living conditions of the industrial revolution sounds like non-stop hero WOD. The example of young ladies being poisoned and dying with fluorescent teeth also paints a pretty grim picture. 


There was one tiny detail that made the book seem a little outdated and that’s the reference to the influenza virus that originated from Spain that killed 40million people. The author calls it a virus impact that has never been seen since which hits a little too close to home during this current pandemic. As I’m writing this now the estimated COVID-19 death tally is around 1.5 million which still makes our current situation seem much lighter than what it’s represented in the news. 


It’s fascinating seeing how many medical advances are made from randomness. The first version of chemotherapy being inspired by friendly fire mustard gas sounds like a fictional movie script. 


This book was very enlightening on cancer and human physiology. Carefully tracing the history back made a dry subject very interesting. Highlighting the differences in protocols, types of cancer, and the many variables at play should help guide people through dealing with cancer more effectively. I can imagine that weighing the pro’s and con’s of different treatments is something that is very hard to do in a tough situation, but should be more feasible after reading this book.


Comment URL copied!
Brennan Morton
September 27th, 2020 at 11:01 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I wish I had this book two years ago before my grandmother

underwent chemo and generally had a worse time of it then the cancer could have

ever done to her with the same end result. 

That said, I found this book highly informative in the history of cancer

research and how it has been viewed over time. 

The first discoveries, such as Pott wandering the street and seeing that

soot was causing cancer, basically finding what we know as carcinogens, to Hamseman

noticing cells abnormality and reversing differentiation, de-evolving, advanced

cancer knowledge in such enormous leaps from late 1700s and 1800s that cancer

suddenly was a known quantity and highly studied.  Early in the 1900s Rous figured out that viruses

could cause cancer, creating a rift in a comprehensive theory on the origins, which

would haunt scientist for almost a century. 

Warburg discovered shortly after that cancer cells ferment glucose in

the presence of oxygen and that healthy cells, when deprived of oxygen for

hours, they would turn cancerous due to the mitochondria becoming irreparably damaged.  Put this on the back burner though, because

his discoveries, while vitally important, are basically snuffed by the science

community thanks to the discovery of DNA. 

They focused solely on DNA, such as cancer is basically a virus that captures

a normal cell gene, perverts it, and then inserts it back into the human

machine.  This lead to the rise of chemo-therapies,

such as mustard gas, even though they only caused brief remissions and often

times lead to more horrible side effects than the cancer itself, such as secondary

malignant tumors and breast cancer.  Big

business got involved and soon there was a booming chemo business, with cocktails

of chemo drugs being pumped in, with only slightly better results.  It wasn’t until Pedersen discovered the

correlation of the faster the growth of tumor, the lower the number of mitochondria

and the more it fermented glucose.  This

was at the same time as targeted drugs rose but failed to produce any real meaningful

results but garnered a majority of the funding. 

Ko, working with Pedersen, discovered 3BP worked well despite being a ridiculously

simple solution, in all cancer types. 

Finally people started looking back at Warburgs work.  Caloric restriction was discovered to have

just as big an effect as most of the drugs and it was soon after discovered

that cancer was driven by cytoplasm, not in the nucleus.  So caloric restrictions were realized to

drive down glucose, which cancer uses as fuel, so that healthy and cancerous

cells compete for energy.  Normal cells

can feed on ketones while cancer cannot, thus starving the cancer while leaving

the other cells undamaged.  Plus, it releases

greater, more aggressive antioxidants that make the healthier cells more robust

against the normal chemo therapy cocktails.

Comment URL copied!
Nicole Christensen
August 17th, 2020 at 3:38 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

After reading the articles posted by the .com for the past decade, I knew of the body of research that presented cancer as a metabolic disease. This book took those concepts and beautifully articulated the history and reasons why we are where we are in the cancer landscape today. 


A year ago my family lost my mother to a rare form of cancer. Armed with CrossFit and its perspective on health and cancer, we felt empowered. Unfortunately, once we began to work with doctors, hospitals, and treatment centers, we were quickly discouraged as the fortress that is cancer treatment provided little innovation and was rooted in our mainstream society’s perspective on health and fitness. 


This book provides the means for new innovation. Getting the science, trials, and treatment to the mainstream will be the challenge. 

Comment URL copied!
John Singleton
July 12th, 2020 at 8:38 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I had not come across the book before it was recommended by the CrossFit Trainer Book Club. So I was excited to have the opportunity to look more deeply into the subject.


Many people know someone either directly or indirectly who has been effected by cancer. It is therefore a very emotive subject and a subject that has obviously been studied and analysed extensively for many years. The book leads you through these studies that were conducted over the last few centuries and intends to connect the dots along the way.


The metabolic theory of cancer is defined as when a cell is damaged the cell no longer generates energy via an oxidative process but via a process that involves sugar.


This definition is crucial to the book and its recommendations, because this definition leads us to the conclusion that, by limiting the amount of sugar a cancer cell has access to, it will impact the ability of the cancer cell to function and spread.


Obviously if the theories of the book hold true, then it has the potential to greatly benefit hundreds of thousands of people each year.


A huge advantage of this theory is that the changes are not driven through pharmaceutical companies and associated drugs, but can be driven primarily through changes in our diet. Meaning that simple changes such as switching to a low carbohydrate diet could in theory limit the proliferation of cancer cells.


As I am not a medical doctor or dietician I don’t feel qualified enough to be able to advise regarding the specifics of what someone should eat to mitigate the potential effects of cancer.


However after finishing the book I was left with the conclusion that in order for people to live a healthy lifestyle they need to exercise. Alongside this if they are worried about the negative effects of the metabolic theory of cancer then they should seriously consider reducing their carbohydrate in take.

Comment URL copied!
Laura Bruner
July 1st, 2020 at 5:47 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I'd start by saying that this book is a MUST read for anyone who is fighting cancer or who knows someone with cancer, but I think at this point, I can say that it is a must read for ALL. It's devastating to think that I don't know a single person who has not been impacted by cancer. I have lost loved ones myself and have seen the devastation firsthand.


With a subject as heartbreaking as cancer, I truly appreciate the positive tone of this book. Rather than taking a doom and gloom approach, Christofferson takes a hopeful tone and perspective, shedding light on where science and medicine fall short, but ultimately sharing the ways in which medicine and society's understanding of this disease is shifting from combating and fighting our bodies to rehabilitation.


I also truly appreciate the in-depth research and clear illustration of history's mistakes side by side with what can be done better. I love the growth mindset and the way Christofferson challenges what we think we know about cancer (which in my case is very little), leaving the reader with a desire to dive more deeply into the research and a reminder to always ask questions versus just taking what we're told, especially in medicine, as doctrine.


I think this is an incredible resource to bring to our athletes and clients. The "battle" against cancer doesn't start when there's a diagnosis. Instead, it's a lifestyle of rehabilitation and constant care and intention. It's up to us as trainers to help educate and guide our athletes and clients to take their health into their own hands. I am grateful for this resource as a means to help me do just that.

Comment URL copied!
Peter Shaw
April 2nd, 2020 at 2:55 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This book has an Albert Einstein quote before the table of contents: The truth of a theory can never be proven; for one never knows if future experience will contradict its conclusions.


This idea seems to be forgotten by so many scientists, doctors, politicians, CEOs, and others who influence and are influenced by the literature that controls decision making. This theme is echoed in every book we have read thus far no matter the topic: cancer, obesity, heart disease, & the scientific process itself.


If there is one thing I will keep in mind when referencing this book, it is that the metabolic theory of cancer is one potential piece to the puzzle and it must continue to be analyzed in light of the somatic mutation theory. There is also a need to question both of these theories and develop a third. The disease has proven most difficult to unravel, so why would we stop there? Stay open minded and use the facts and data to guide us.


Like the heart disease hypothesis, understanding the history of the SMT of cancer and its treatments sheds light on the need for alternative thinking. Clearly there is a plethora of data pointing us in the direction of a metabolic based disease, so why is there such push back from SMT advocates? I believe this can largely be attributed to a misunderstanding of the context in which a theory is created. The history helps to rationalize the need for “outside the box” thinking, which in turn allows one to accept the evidence.


An interesting thought I had that shone through in later chapters is the fact that when looking at the cellular biology, many ideas generated from each theory need elements of the other for support. Take chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) for example:

  • (SMT) Genetic swap leading to development of BCR-ABL —> activation of PI3K/AKT pathway
  • (MT) Damaged mitochondria —> activation of PI3K/AKT pathway
  • Researchers found that this “genetic swap” exists in perfectly healthy people who will never develop CML, but I did not read about damaged mitochondria activating the same pathway in healthy people…
  • The point being that one cannot completely ignore the other, and I believe this is ultimately the message Travis Christofferson is trying to make.


Another curious thought is the fact that the mitochondria’s genetic material accounts for much of its function (shown by the ability to transfer cytoplasm and maintain functional mitochondria). It is clear that mitochondrial genetics is inherently linked in some form, whether it be upstream or downstream of the metabolic effect.


Ultimately, this all comes down to the effect of the treatment on the patient suffering from the disease. It seems clear to me that there are several possible alternative treatments that could arise from the metabolic theory, but for what ever reason the ideas have been shut out of the mainstream. The excuses that we make for ourselves to avoid these potential benefits are many, but the resounding chorus of cancer wins still haunts us.


My hope is that we grow tired of letting cancer win, but not lethargic. We need to harness the frustration into motivation to finding a cure. It is clear that there are many possibilities, and the journey will not be easy, but if we keep questioning and stay curious, at least we will know we are headed in the right direction (strictly speaking — any direction) and not stuck in a stalemate.

Comment URL copied!
Andrea Tapia
March 24th, 2020 at 3:58 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I have been so grateful for the amazing book selections so far, but this book was by far the most impactful.


We lost my father-in-law to stomach cancer in 2008. We found CrossFit about 3 years later and often remarked about how things might have been different if we had only known then what we learned as we dug deeper into the CrossFit lifestyle and methodology.


I finished reading this book about two weeks ago and found out last Friday my dad has been referred to a cancer center as they suspect he has leukemia.


My husband and I saw traditional cancer treatment completely suck the life from my father-in-law, and in the end the aggressive treatments took him, not the cancer. We were eager to have him participate in a clinical trial, not completely understanding that he was referred to this trial, not because they had hope for him, but because they had reached the end of their road and expected he wouldn’t survive.


While I have extreme fear for my dad, this book has given me hope and an option utilizing nutrition and HBOT and fasting as a compliment to traditional treatment. I know when the doctor recommends eating carbs and milkshakes, there is another way.


I could ramble on and certainly don’t express myself as eloquently and intelligently as the incredible crew of trainers posting before me, but thank you HQ and Coach Glassman for continuing to show us the way. For continuing to lead us to the “lifeboat”.

Comment URL copied!
Gale Yocom II
March 15th, 2020 at 2:02 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping Over The Truth


In most arguments, there is always a battle of I am right and let me prove it. Christofferson provides overwhelming information and solid backing that Cancer is not a random human selection but an actual disease that has its origins by decisions we make. As a reader, I always question points and conclusions that are put forth with curiosity and disbelief. I want / need proof! Solid objective information. Christofferson provided ample cases and examples of this throughout the book that cancer is a metabolic disorder which means we have the opportunity to control our outcomes based on daily choices of food selection that we make. I expected this read to be tied completely to just nutritional guidance and was surprised to see other theories, medical discoveries, and treatments given. The human body is complex and it continues to evolve and protect itself just as the cancer cells themselves.


Although there are so many concepts and approaches that are presented above my pay grade and many of the readers that tackled this book. I discovered and believe that Balance is our most effective approach. We teach this concept of Balance in CrossFit in every aspect of Fitness & Nutrition. We use the word Constantly Varied but in reality that is balance across time and modal domains. We specifically discuss balance of real food in our nutrition prescription. Human civilization has evolved through the years to understand and grow in our knowledge of the human body and we need to use balance in those medical treatments. As I finished the book and tried to wrap my mind around all the points provided, it comes down to balance. We should not ignore the medicines and therapies that have evolved through the years, balance of lifestyle choices, balance in diet to combat this disease.


I am left to think if 20 years ago this data was presented to my family would it have impacted the vast majority of my relatives that passed away or went through “therapies” or will this data and understanding of cancer change in another 20 years. My personal view will always come down to evolve and balance. Our best defense is balance in all choices and ensuring our nutrition is balanced, our external stimuli on our body is balanced, and find that balance between medical discoveries to combat this disease. I will always be a pessimist to think the impact and usefulness of medical treatments, but also grateful that our civilization has evolved to have many useful ones. It is sad to read how much politics, money, and profit are hindering are advancement in combating and preventing this disease. Where would my family be now ?

Comment URL copied!
Jennifer Hunter-Marshall
March 7th, 2020 at 3:10 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I finished reading this book at a particularly difficult time for me personally. My mother, a 12 year breast cancer survivor, is now dealing with the aggressive side effects of what was done to her to treat her cancer. I wish we had been presented with the information provided in this book. Perhaps it would have made a difference in my mother's overall health during her treatment and after. It is deeply troubling to know that all of this information has been around for years, but treatment practices had remained the same. I am encouraged that we are speaking about it now.


"The continuum of science has little room for ego". This line from the book really resonated with me. Science and the pursuit of the truth should not be beholden to ego or money. Theories and methods must be rigorously challenged and tested. There is no one size fits all with cancer. We may never know all the answers, but I am left hoping that we never stop searching, retesting, and questioning. The price to be paid if we don't is too great.


Comment URL copied!
Dorota Stenclova
March 7th, 2020 at 11:25 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Prior to reading this book I had basically no knowledge about cancer treatment. This topic is obviously very complex, but I enjoyed how the book combined science with stories making it fairly easy to read. It surprised me how difficult it is to make drugs like 3-Bromopyruvate available to help cancer patients or to even get any drugs tested and approved, granted that the testing does not always have a successful result as many of the examples in the book show. The biggest takeaway for me is the metabolic nature of cancer and the Warburg effect. 


My grandad was diagnosed with cancer a few years ago and nutrition is something that doctors would never address with cancer patients, at least in the Czech Republic. They would simply encourage them to eat whatever they feel like, because their appetite drops significantly especially during chemotherapy. Reading the book and looking at a high carbohydrate diet that my grandad has been eating his entire life and continued eating while he had been diagnosed with cancer and after he was treated, it certainly did not help his condition. Of course, one cannot completely prevent or treat cancer with ketogenic diet, but if it is something that might help the cancer patients, then more people and more importantly doctors should be aware of it. I hope that this book can bring more attention to this and ultimately help treat cancer more efficiently in the future. 

Comment URL copied!
Philipp Imbusch
March 5th, 2020 at 9:17 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This book was surprising to me - not because of the theory of dietary intervention offering a possibility to halp support the treatment of cancer - but the fact that this theory and data was available 70 years ago !

The author dives into the history of cancer treatments and showcases how this approach had been ready to use many years ago, while on the other hand also showing methods that have been promoted by many doctors and healthcare institutions, that were treating cancer like a DNA disease. It is crazy to think that the research that provided an option to attacking cancer cells with non invasive and relativly harmless methods was disregarded for such a long time.

There are many sections and pieces in the book that convinvingly make the case to follow these non chemical treatments in order to starve cancer cells of their main energy source glucose - and I believe this is where we as trainers can impact lives of our clients, friends and families - by educating them on this additonal weapon in their arsenal, fighting cancer.

The CrossFit Level1 and Level2 offer simple, easy to use solutions, how one can scale and adjust ones diet - even to the point of a ketogenic diet that would be beneficial in cancer treatment according to this book.

Of course, there is no perfect solution, and the drive to understand how to effectivly fight cancer needs to develope - but one can hope that by combining medicinal and chemical treatments, together with methods that weaken and starve cancer cells via dietary interventions and long term changes can help many patients on their road to recovery and "beating" cancer.

After reading this book it struck me as really surprising that not more has been done to close our knowledge gaps when it comes to understanding how to effectivly treat cancer outside of established treatments, offered as a "one size fits all" approach.I wanted to know if more had been done since the release of the book in 2014 and after researching further locally, it seems that by now, more and more specialists have taken on multiple angles of treating cancer ,and are including the diet as one of the first levers to pull. A great developement, that this book might have aided.




Comment URL copied!
Melody-Sara Feldman
March 5th, 2020 at 3:43 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This latest book club selection was eye-opening. Prior to reading Tripping Over The Truth, I did not have much information to oppose the genetic theory of cancer as its primary cause. Based on the research outlined by the genome project, it is clear that there is (still) a large gap in our understanding of cancer, and that genetics are NOT the primary cause. However, the Warburg effect is just that--an effect--of cancer, and it doesn't seem like even the cutting-edge science discussed has an answer to its cause. That being said, we do have a better approach to treating some cancers, as the book delineates, by combining traditional treatment methods with a ketogenic diet. I think that this is the biggest practical takeaway, something that can be implemented now. I hope that the scientists discussed in this book can find some traction with funding and research, and hopefully the summarizing of their findings in this book helps push this forward.

Comment URL copied!
Thiago Borges
March 3rd, 2020 at 11:58 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

After reading the book, I came to the conclusion that this is one of those readings that everyone needs to take, since we all have contact with someone who is struggling with some type of cancer today.

In the course of the book, in which the author draws the timeline of cancerous diseases, he also explores many theories raised over the years that have been discredited or have not achieved effective results.

The author argues in a clear and cohesive way about cancer as a metabolic disease and also talks about chemical treatments that could be more effective.


What makes me think, over the previous readings, is how science gives us the feeling that we are "questioning everything again" for realizing how much we could have evolved in the area of ​​health a long time ago.


But, I believe that the book presents more real and applicable situations and theories in reality for working on the weaknesses of the cells.

Comment URL copied!
Jamie Johnson
March 3rd, 2020 at 9:53 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This book gives its reader an amazingly simple insight into the characteristics unique to the disease of cancer, human cell biology and unfortunately, the bureaucracy/ego that divides all of our precious resources (financial and academic).


Travis Christofferson makes a compelling argument that the origins of the disease stem from the characteristics of our genetic dispositions that we inherit and more from the metabolic dysfunction of our cells (the shift from the reliance of an aerobic form of energy production to an anaerobic).


The science discussed in this read is incredibly complex, however Christofferson’s style of writing helps the most layman of scientists become expert (yours truly) by way of linking each principle and theory with easy to understand examples/analogies of each idea.


The time and money invested in the research of this disease and the hopes that have been shattered since our ability to map the human genome should tell the medical research fraternity that no theory should be ignored like the Wourbourg (metabolic) theory has been for the last 100 years. The pioneers that have stayed true to their interpretation of the evidence now deserve to prove themselves I.e. Pederson, Ko..etc.


Leave the ‘dark matter’ theory to the physicists and start to invest in human cancer trials of 3BP, restricted calorie ketogenic diets and hyperbaric chambers.


I have become a smarter person having read this book. I highly recommend it.


I hope this book can steer our decision makers in medical research (government/pharmaceutical) can divert the billions of dollars and years of laboratory time towards roads that lead us somewhere not dead ends as the somatic mutation theory has.

Comment URL copied!
John Brown
March 3rd, 2020 at 9:35 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

While I found Christopherson's perspective insightful, I am left dissatisfied in many ways. First, it would seem that folks on both sides of the aisle are convinced that they are right while staring into glaring and expensive examples of how they are not. And not just not correct in terms of thinking about cancer, but more specifically in the way that they are thinking about the cost of human life. In almost every example given in the book there is a dollar sign attached, even for Dr. Ko, whose formulation for 3BP may in fact be a miracle drug in the battle against cancer but we may never know because of the battle over the intellectual property behind it. What a shame if the people closest to us die because of the need to be "the one."


My current opinion on cancer is that no one knows what is going on and anyone that tells you that they do is strictly fooling themselves. I regularly sit in an office and listen to doctors (who truly are trying to do the best for their patients) suggest treatment options that they completely know will not work but instead will significantly impact the quality of life of their patient. They do this because the only other option that they seem to have is to tell their patient that there is nothing else that they can do for them. On the research side, it seems that these incredibly smart and hard working people are doing some really good work, but rarely have to look a patient or their husband in the eye when discussing the side effects of their therapies. Additionally, I have seen what a strictly adhered to metabolic plan can look like as an adjunct to traditional treatment protocols and maybe they work for a while and maybe they assist therapies to work better for a while, but pronouncing them as the end to cancer is just as negligent and arrogant as the people who deem them incorrect out of hand.


Look at me, I'm rambling... To the point of the book, Christopherson is right in that we do not understand this disease and we are watching people die because of lack of understanding. Maybe it is time to scratch it all and start over again.

Comment URL copied!
Kelly Brown
March 3rd, 2020 at 4:52 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Like so many others on this thread, my life has been profoundly affected by Cancer. I read this book a year ago in hopes that it would provide a more rational and realistic approach to the topic than some of Christofferson's contemporaries. I was not disappointed on this, and I echo the sentiments above regarding his inclusion of his very personal experiences with both the successes and imperfections of this approach.


I can say beyond a shadow of a doubt that a ketogenic diet does not cure all Cancer for all people. I am proof of that. However, I do believe there is a distinct possibility that it is helping (and certainly not hurting) and for that reason alone, it is worth a try for anyone looking down the barrel of that gun. In contrast to the essentially passive experience of established Cancer treatment, the sense of control over your own outcomes that the dietary approach provides is huge. In contrast, the challenge of adhering to it in the face of every social, emotional, and cultural norm should not be underestimated. People will judge you. Doctors with the best of intentions will tell you you are a fool. It is easy to get to a place where you start to think that if you eat even one slice of birthday cake you will die. It is really hard. As Coach likes to say, it is simple, but it is not easy.


As coaches and trainers (and humans) this is valuable knowledge and perspective. We must be very careful, however, to stay in our lane on this one. While inarguably barbaric, conventional therapies do reduce and in some cases defeat Cancer. That is a really, really important fact to every person facing this disease. In our search for a better way, we must not forget to use all the tools at our disposal. Christofferson's acknowledgement of this is appropriate and appreciated.

Comment URL copied!
Jaime Imbusch
March 3rd, 2020 at 12:11 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

While reading this book I couldn’t help but think about all the cancer patients who sacrificed their life for the sake of science. The first part of the book discusses how cancer was discovered and the journey scientists made in attempting to cure it. Warburgs theory, now, makes a lots of sense, but I can see how other scientists in the field would ignore it. Its unreal to think Warburgs theory had been disregarded for decades before Pederson came along to bring it back to life. Christofferson does a great job at making the technical areas of the book paletable. By the end of the book I was filled with hope for cancer treatments in the decades to come.  

Comment URL copied!
Carlos Fernandez
March 3rd, 2020 at 12:04 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This is the first book that I’ve read on this topic and I am blessed this is my first exposure. It seems a little unreal to believe that there are methods of treatment that are proven effective like 3BP, R-KD and HBOT, which are less harmful to cancer patients yet they don’t seem to be given much value or approval. “Like R-KD with HBOT, 3BP appears to be largely nontoxic therapy that could potentially treat any cancer that is PET positive, which equates to 95 percent of cancers” (p.176). If the metabolic theory is true, then there needs to be a paradigm shift away from the somatic mutation theory. Ko, Pedersen, D’Agostino and Seyfried have shown great results parallel to the orignal work by Otto Warburg all the way back from 1930s, demonstrating that there is another way to treat cancer. It seems like there may be a conflict of interest from those who benefit from cancer being this complex disease that seems impossible to cure. Hopefully within the near future, examples of new regimens like the Metabolically Supported Chemotherapy in Turkey where they combine whatever method works to disturbed the cancer cell by exploiting their metabolic derangement. If these results gain enough traction maybe other countries with more freedom to work around the norm like Turkey will follow their lead. 

Comment URL copied!
Liang Kong
March 3rd, 2020 at 10:17 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

"Tripping Over the Truth" - first heard about the book was two years ago while driving with Dale to visit affiliates in the south of China. On that long drive, I heard lots of mind-blowing facts in terms of the American Medical system, especially the treatment for cancers, which profoundly influenced globally. After a lengthy explanation of why the simple facts so tripped the world, Dale left me with the most devastating line from his mouth with a long sigh, "Welcome to the real world, my friend."

Last month was my reread of this profoundly written book. The hard feeling, like a heavy rock on my heart, was still present during my revisit. Like one of my close doctor friends once replied when encountering the question of "how would you rank your performance or contribution as a doctor." 20 out of 100 was the answer. Why? One-third of the patients were recovered by themselves; One-third of them had no cures; the rest were only 'possible' to be treated by Morden medical treatment; most of the time are not. As a doctor, he said, there so many things are out of control. There is a substantially invisible tornado in the system; you either run with it or swept out by it.

Comment URL copied!
Brunno Silva
March 3rd, 2020 at 3:48 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Among all the complex information inside the book, which I’ll reread again to better understanding, I tried to stick to the simplest. It seems clear the evidence that support the idea of a problem in the respiratory system of the cell, which leads to a break in the chromosomes. It surprised me when the author mentions that if you get a nucleus of a cancerous cell and put in an normal cells nothing happens. But the opposite if you can put a nucleus of normal cell in a cancerous cell and put it in a mice, the mice will have cancer.


Amazes me also the reason why people in scientific community didn’t accepted de Warburg effect as a possible theory. Simply because they don’t want to. It’s said how suddenly some people become “The owner of the Knowledge” and they are responsible for deciding if a Theory is good or bad, even if they haven’t tested. Instead of progress this leads to a delayed science and influence negatively in many’s people’s lives.

Comment URL copied!
Lachlan Learg
March 3rd, 2020 at 2:27 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

'Tripping Over the Truth' has been my favorite edition to the book club thus far! With current statistics suggesting that nearly half of us will get cancer in our lifetime I believe it's a book that any health conscious person should read. Not only because it offers a new way of looking at the disease but because it presents readers with an accessible history of our knowledge of cancer and how we've arrived at our current understanding.


As Christofferson points out: 'We have not been at this very long at all. The first chemotherapy was developed in the middle of World War II.' Hence our understanding of the disease and how to treat it should still be evolving. But completely understanding such an elusive, diabolical target, has, to date, been beyond man.


'Whether God, Mother Nature, evolution, or whatever shaped the world we live in, we must concede that in the realm of disease, cancer is its masterpiece. It is the Mozart, the Houdini, and the Einstein of maladies. The way she has enticed us with comprehension only to pull back out of reach is horrible and, I dare say, even beautiful. Cancer is pathological artistry.'


Sadly the SMT (genetic) theory has lead scientists to a dead end. Christofferson explains why the genetic theory of cancer gained popularity and why it has been pursued by the vast majority of scientists to date. It's reasonable, it makes sense how and why we've arrived here. But the problem is it's one-dimensional and doesn't leave scientists with anywhere else to go. Cancer seems almost bulletproof and to date our best approach has been with treatment designed to defeat cancer often at the expense of all else by poisoning patients and hoping their cells can take a higher dose than the cancer cells.


Refreshingly the metabolic theory suggests that cancer cells aren't invincible. It 'illuminates the disadvantage of cancer and exposes its Achilles' heel. Cancer cells are not, immortal, gritty, adaptable super-cells.'


Looking at cancer differently opens up a whole new world of treatment options or even prevention in the first place. I think Christofferson best put what the metabolic theory means as:


'This scenario implies that cancer cells are not mutated versions of cells with superpowers programmed by an omniscient supervillian. They are damaged cells trying to survive in their own misguided way. They can be corralled, guided, manipulated and killed.'


Optimism abounds in 'Tripping Over the Truth' because we now have a new approach to a vexing problem. And that approach, to a certain extent, is something we can take on ourselves. If one were to be afflicted with cancer and was receiving conventional treatment they're not really at any greater loss to try a restricted ketogenic diet in tandem with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on top of that conventional therapy. And with reports of lessened impacts from chemotherapy, higher success rates and lower rates of re-occurrence it seems like a no brainer and something that needs to be observed to gather more and more data.


It's a book that has made me much more hopeful in regards to the issue and also restored some faith that their are many bright minds out there not restricted by scientific dogma who are doing everything they can to help mankind.

Comment URL copied!
Jonathan Mears
March 3rd, 2020 at 2:15 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

While I have learned much from every book we’ve read this might be the one I engaged with the most. There was a lot of highs and Lows with this read. I have lost two of my best friends to cancer and one aunt. The highs we’re learning that 3BP could actually kill cancer at such a rapid pace that it’s too fast. Toxicity builds up too quickly from the cancers death. But seems a very promising drug. The low of that would be it’s held up for legal reasons and bureaucracy. So, instead trying to save people we need a good legal battle.


I loved the historical context and backgrounds to each person in the story. How some of them stumbled into cancer research from other fields.

Seems that the answer to cancer being a metabolic problem was always there from the Beginning. But, as we get more technology and worked the human genome scientist said “Yes, we can dig deeper, and find the root cause of cancer.” But the narrow focus, singular idea, led to everyone realizing cancer is like nothing else. It was fascinating to learn that ever cell within a tumor can be different. As unique as a fingerprint. One of the few constants of cancer is it needs to feed on carbohydrate fuel source. It cannot switch to ketones and shift it’s mitochondria to use alternate fuel sources.

The end of the book was highly informative that we don’t need the poison of chemotherapy to help deal with this disease. Ketogenic diet, hypobaric chamber, seems to have very positive effects without the suffering of chemo. No one wants to get a terrible disease and on top of that deal with sickness and weight loss. Also, there’s the possibility that you’re getting better not cause of chemo, but caloric restriction due to chemo.

Comment URL copied!
Joe DeGain
March 3rd, 2020 at 2:08 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This book was once again a thought provoking experience.  My mind always wants to transition into the practical way I can use this information.  Since my passion and livelihood is being a fitness trainer, I long to empower my athletes to own their nutrition.  If as a trainer I can give confidence to my athletes with nutrition, be it Keto, IM, Zone, CYM, etc…, then I hopefully can provide them with the tools to control their nutrition if themselves or a loved is suffering from a malady.   I would like to believe that if a client of mine can dominate a diet of real foods, or 40/30/30, or the Zone, they can be confident enough to believe they have the discipline to adapt their nutrition in any fashion needed.  If I have empowered my clients with the knowledge and ability to implement the ketogenic diet, then I would absolutely believe they would have confidence for themselves to implement it.  However, even if they did not contract a malady requiring nutritional assistance, if their loved ones did then this would still be good news with “knowledge as power” being close to the epicenter.  Essentially, the book inspires me again to find ways and strategies to provide the tools necessary for my clients to own their nutrition.  

The simple, layman’s takeaway I had from the book is that cancer cells need glucose to survive.  Stripping that glucose from the body via keto means we switch over to ketones as an energy source, but cancer cells can not use ketones as an efficient fuel, so they suffer.  I look forward to sharing this simple knowledge with my athletes before/after class, just to be thought provoking.  The title of the book and the fact that the resources are listed in the back will be great knowledge to provide where necessary as well.  

Thanks for the push here, HQ.  Enjoying the education!

Comment URL copied!
Todd Widman
March 3rd, 2020 at 2:03 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping Over The Truth


Of our book club reads thus far I found Tripping Over the Truth to be the most challenging. Not only is the information dense, but the topic is personally brutal as all of the family members that have passed since my birth, save one, have expired by the demonic manacles of cancer. I found myself asking ‘why aren’t people using these prescriptions’ throughout the pages, only to be faced with another anecdote describing yet another study, or test, or drug that worked wonders only to be largely ignored by most oncologists.


Thankfully, however, I stuck through to the end, and was given reprieve to my frustration of reading this book when I got to the Afterword. In these powerful last 17 pages Mr. Christofferson gave some personal stories that really put the topic in full, panoramic view for me. Personally touched by cancer when his mother was diagnosed in 2014, he added a more human close with “It’s a very tough problem, and I sympathize with the oncologists- they are put in a difficult position. Again: “Nothing is perfect. Life is messy. Relationships are complex. Outcomes are uncertain. People are irrational.” In most cases, I think, people are simply doing the best they can.” (p 199) He also gave credence to ‘combinational therapy’ (p. 193) where all possible avenues are combined to best fight the cancer in the individual, which just makes so much sense; use all the tools availed at that given moment to fight this horrible disease.


In summation, however, I am struck at the power of food and the potential that the Ketogenic Diet might have such a combative role in fighting cancer. If anyone close to me is ever again diagnosed with cancer I will be sure to get them a book on the subject. Thank you for this read HQ, it is worth it.

Comment URL copied!
Matthew Swift
March 3rd, 2020 at 12:44 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

“Never run away from a fight. The farther you run, the more difficult it will be to fight back.” What a great quote!


This book made me realize how very little I know about cancer. I found myself intrigued as to why I have never considered what it actually is, beyond a very cursory thinking that it is out of control cell growth triggered by some carcinogen. Perhaps growing up it was such a ubiquitous topic that concern trumped curiosity. I finished the book feeling a bit further down the path with some rudimentary understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It certainly made me more curious. Overall, I found it to be a very well written and enjoyable read, and a great primer to now loop back and reread the many articles on the Warburg effect that have been published on the Essentials page.


Apart from the discussion on the Metabolic theory of cancer, the book has many valuable insights into cell metabolism and genetics. I think this is a very useful read to bolster trainer knowledge on nutrition and how the body works, well beyond just the topic of cancer. I learned that “In biology, structure equals function” and "Aging is really counted as how many times our stem cells have had to divide. And because each time a stem cell divides there is a finite chance of some sort of epigenetic damage, what we find is that in older people there’s been an accumulation of these epigenetic events that is easily measurable in DNA." Two of many “aha” moments.


The afterward provides an excellent set of resources on the ketogenic diet. It was so refreshing to see a scientific opinion book conclude with applied knowledge and useful resource references. Christofferson managed to finish this book on a high note, which is a pleasant change from the previous books that have left me somewhat in despair. There may be significant further clinical research required to validate the ketogenic diet as a cancer therapy, but there seems to be little cost and significant health benefits to incorporating calorie restriction through intermittent fasting and reducing carbohydrates as a foundation for a healthy life. It seems like a smart play as a preventative measure with little downside.


As for the actual theme of the book that cancer is a disease of metabolism rather than the accepted hypothesis that it is of genetic origin, I don’t feel I have the knowledge or qualification to add anything to the technical discussion. However, once again it appears that human factors play a huge role in the direction that the medical industry takes in terms of disease and illness. There is a repeat of the meta-problem discussed in the previous books. Careers and industries are built on accepted hypotheses, and once they have momentum there is too much at stake for those rewarded by the system to allow it to change.  


“It costs more than $100 million to bring a drug to market”. That is a lot of skin in the game. I was dumbstruck by the following paragraph … "The cost for cancer drugs went from an average per treatment course of about $5,000 before 2000 to $40,000 by 2005, and in 2012 almost every new drug was priced at more than $100,000 in the United States. The United States spent twice as much as any other country on oncology and medical care in general yet achieved the same survival rate except for breast cancer and lymphoma, where it eked out a 1 to 2 percent improvement."


The author is cautious to note that Seyfried and D’Agostino’s “mitochondria enhancement therapy” - restricted ketogenic diet (R-KD) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) - is yet to be proven, but surely the hope it provides should motivate research funding? ..."It is possible that one day R-KD combined with HBOT could replace radiation altogether, especially considering that HBOT is able to target cancer anywhere in the body and radiation is not. They say that R-KD combined with HBOT “could potentially kill tumor cells as effectively as radiation without causing toxic collateral damage to normal cells.”


But if you are invested heavily in the SMT theory, the thought that you are heading in the wrong direction must be unfathomable. As the author notes, Seyfried and D’Agostino’s vision has serious implications. "For the most lucrative branch of medicine, radiation oncology, it would mean “pink slips” on an unprecedented scale throughout cancer centers all over the world. It is not unrealistic to expect friction."


How do researchers get funding and explore novel ideas and therapies when the only acceptable outcome is the ability to produce a product for the investor whilst conforming to the consensus?  ...“The problem is money. Because metabolic cancer treatment is so cheap, ironically, it is difficult to get funding”. There are parallels here with the genius of Coach Glassman’s 100 words of fitness. I suspect the majority of CrossFit’s detractors push back because they can’t own or monetize it. Performing functional movements and eating well is cheap and that is problematic for the established (and broken) health industry.


Overall a great book and one that I would like to reread. The theme of the book club is becoming clear, and best summarized in the words of mind extraordinaire Edward de Bono … “Most executives, many scientists, and almost all business school graduates believe that if you analyze data, this will give you new ideas. Unfortunately, this belief is totally wrong. The mind can only see what it is prepared to see.”

   


Comment URL copied!
Lachlan Learg
March 3rd, 2020 at 1:00 am

Matt, totally agree with the point of the book club and the quote of "The mind can only see what it is prepared to see." is bang on. What has been refreshing about the book club is how much there is to see! 'Tripping Over the Truth' presents a broad history of our understanding of cancer rather than just the metabolic theory of cancer and leaves the reader with so much to ponder. The positive being we have options to research further, rather than being stuck at a dead end.

Comment URL copied!
Terence Kealey
March 3rd, 2020 at 12:13 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

This is obviously a striking book, and ever since Warburg's original findings it's been apparent that cancer seems to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. But I don't see why we need to assume cancer is either a dysfunction of nuclear DNA or of mitochondria; it could just as much be a set of primary non-mitochondrial dysfunctions with a common final pathway that involve the mitochondria. And of course mitochondrial dysfunctions may feed back to the nucleus or other organelles. Moreover, the idea that mitochondrial dysfunction turns apoptosis off is obviously compelling, as is the idea that dichloroacetate or similar compounds might activate pyruvate dehydrogenase and so help reverse the mitochondrial metabolic abnormality.

There is evidence that ketogenic diets may help potentiate standard chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic treatments, and that alone must represent a significant validation for the idea of considering cancer as a disease of metabolism. That approach, moreover, also shows us how to proceed, by careful clinical evaluation of these ideas, preferably by trials that approach blinded and randomised trials as closely as possible. Such human trials are of course difficult and expensive, but animal options may be available.

For me personally, as a biochemist who did his PhD in a lab where many scientists worked on pyruvate dehydrogenase, these recent developments have been very exciting, and I look forward to their clinical testing. Claude Bernard once said that a scientist needs to remove their imagination in the morning when they remove their overcoat, and they need to put it back on, with their overcoat, when they leave the lab in the evening. I'm jealous of the people who'll be putting on their white coats to test these metabolic ideas: why didn't we have these ideas all those years ago, when we were talking of little else but pyruvate dehydrogenase in a hospital setting where so many patients were being treated for cancer?

Comment URL copied!
Elie Margerin
March 3rd, 2020 at 12:12 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Pour tous les francophones et les français qui se documentent sur CrossFit.com. Chaque mois est organisée une discussion ouverte et la plupart du temps en anglais autour d'un ouvrage à visée généralement scientifique, sortant parfois des sentiers battus et luttant contre des allégations scientifiques non fondées. ,

Le livre de ce mois, traite du cancer, ce que l'on sait de cette terrible maladie, de son origine, de l'inefficacité de son traitement et de son fonctionnement. SI vous maîtrisez l'anglais je vous invite à consulter cet ouvrage qui se lit (ou s'écoute) presque comme une enquête policière (c'est cool).

A la lecture de ce livre, on en vient à remettre en question l'idée selon laquelle l'apparition d'un cancer serait simplement génétique, ou dû à certaines prédisposition. L'auteur met aussi en lumière comment notre mode de vie actuel, mis en perspective avec le fonctionnement d'une cellule cancéreuse, pourrait s'avérer être un facteur aggravant dans l'apparition et le développement d'une tumeur.

A l'aide d'exemples précis, techniques et étayés, l'auteur parvient à appuyer l'idée qu'une alimentation notamment pauvre en glucides pourrait s'avérer être une arme redoutable pour lutter contre le métabolisme même du cancer.

En espérant retrouver de plus en plus de commentaires en français lors de ces échanges.


My thought to Math D and Jobst.

Comment URL copied!
Jacqueline Aumeyr
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:47 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

When I read the title of the book, I thought “alright bring on the nutrition.” This book delivered that and so much more. Tipping over the Truth: How the

Metabolic Theory of Cancer is Overturning One of Medicine’s Most Entrenched Paradigms by Travis Christofferson ended being a surprisingly enjoyable read through well constructed prose, well chosen information that gave me even more gratitude for what is taught at the Level 1 course, and leaving me with one sentence that has been rattling around in my brain since finishing the bookthat has caused me the really dig deeper into my own thoughts.

              I found this book well written in that it was much more accessible than some of the other books we’ve been reading. I am sorry (es tut mir leid) Benjamin but I must disagree with your comment that this book reads more like textbook. Yes, there are some very good doses of science in the book but Christofferson does a good job to explain those pieces or offer easily digestible breakdowns of what you’ve been reading about. Further, he was able find the story of the science and the scientists involved in it and appropriately intermixed bits of storytelling and science to keep the book moving. I enjoyed reminiscing about my own relation to public opinion and various points in the timeline of the book and that he built up why some people got so excited about certain developments, even if he ended up tearing the developments down. It was nice to be on the ride as he took us through chucks of cancer research history.

              I definitely learned a lot more about cancer in reading this book. There would be plenty to write on that topic alone. However, whenever I read these books I always do so from the point of view of “what is the importance for me as CrossFit trainer and what does it mean for those I interact with.” Some of the book, like Rigor Mortis left me with a doomsday feeling. This book has left others with a doomsday feeling, but I came away with a much more positive outlook. This information is just another big check in the plus column for our elegant solution to the world’s most vexing problems, another reason to convince someone to give it try. It never gets old how well the definitions and prescriptions that Glassman and CrossFit created out of the want for proper terminology and protocol are continually supported, advance, and even by some standards vindicated by evolving science. Not only is this another reason to be grateful for our nutrition prescription but it is also a chance to appreciate the quality of our definition of fitness and health. Not only do we encourage healthy, preventative fueling of our body, but we condition, improve, and perform routine maintenance on the metabolic pathways now and through our life. We created a way for the prevention and possible cure, treatment, etc. of cancer without that even being the aim.

              Besides appreciation and gratitude for what we teach there was one sentence that completely struck me. “Ironically, the biggest obstacle we have is the fact that the diet is free.” (p.177) Yes, this sentence was in relation to the side of implementation and we are and have been talking about the problems profit creates in medicine and science. However, it has sent thinking in the opposite direction, compliance from those I would hope to help with the diet. It is also a large obstacle that it is free. The book talks about scientists wanting the magic bullet, but – as is commonly stated – the public are also looking for the

magic bullet and many can only see that or are motivated if it is accompanied by a monetary value. Moreover, it is free, you have the power at every second to choose your nutrition. It is indeed your choice. That can be overwhelming, that can create complacency, that can…create many problems in and of itself. I feel less helpful battling a broken medial system, but I can help others with their ability to choose the free things for themselves. I’ve been mulling over ways to get people over the free barrier. If I can do a bit better, maybe it is all the difference to someone else.

Comment URL copied!
Reza Mashkoori
March 2nd, 2020 at 8:27 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I don’t know much about cancer and its treatment. This book did a great job at laying out the framework of what cancer is and where and how therapies and interventions came into effect. It was interesting that chemo therapy was indirectly derived from mustard gas in World War 2. It also does an excellent job at painting the picture of Cancer as a metabolic disease. 


The book talks about the different theories behind cancer but focuses on Otto Warburgs idea that cancer is a metabolic disease. The book basically starts with Warburg and chronologically introduces the other scientists who have kept his theory alive over the years. 


There are 2 things I took away from this book. The first involves my wife’s grand father. He is 84 years old and worked as a construction worker earlier in life. He was exposed to asbestos and was destined to acquire mesothelioma. However, he was also a type 2 diabetic who was prescribed Metformin. One portion of the book discusses how type 2 diabetics who are prescribed metformin are less likely to acquire cancer as the metformin lowers blood sugar. My wife’s grandfather still shows no signs of mesothelioma, proving this theory correct. 


The second take away point was a conversation I had with my friend who is an MD in the United States. When I proposed this theory to him, he thought I was joking. He actually thought I was trying to upset him. When I sent him the books title and a short summary, he couldn’t believe it and refused to. He claimed that it went against everything he was ever educated on. It was interesting to me how through all his education, he was never even offered this theory of cancer as a metabolic disease. I couldn’t help but think that there’s a flaw in the system if doctors aren’t being educated on this and they think its a joke when they are presented with it. 


Overall, this was an awesome book and I will likely try it again. It also helped light the fire for a no sugar challenge at our affiliate! 

Comment URL copied!
Terence Kealey
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:27 pm


Comment URL copied!
Gregory Kerschbaum
March 2nd, 2020 at 6:53 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I was really excited to read this book. Having no real prior knowledge about cancer other than its really bad and seems to be more and more prevalent as time goes on. It was very educational to see how the disease works and walk through the progression of how it was explored and treated. I found it really strange how hard the proponents of SMT held to their beliefs even as numerous times throughout the timeline they had to make up new theories to continue to explain away why the data didn’t fit with their original thoughts even as far as making up something unseen like dark matter. I also found it really strange how whenever mainstream science put down Warburg theory or anyone who Carried his theory forward, they conveniently left out any rationale as to why it was wrong. It was just pushed aside without having to explain anything away, almost scoffed at. It seemed the thought that it was a simple solution to the problem that connected all cancers together was too simple to be correct... But why would we go to a more complex solution if the simple solution will work, it seems an odd choice to start with a more complex answer. One thing I can only think from everything in this book is that its not profitable enough to have diet or a simple answer to the problem. Drug companies if SML is the answer can make drugs that target each different mutation and thereby making billions of dollars off this... I am continually disheartened in our society today, why Nutrition is not more of a focus as far as prevention of disease, it seems clear that nutrition can play a large role even in diseases such as cancer, Keto was how epilepsy was treated until medicine came out with drugs and then it was pushed to the side, even though it worked. I do know that medicine is important and in no way am I trying to say we shouldn’t produce new drugs, but it seems as if we are afraid to tell someone that part of your solution should be to get rid of processed foods, or stop eating carbohydrates, “hey this relatively cheap lifestyle change will make a huge impact on your life, etc”.... does it really just come back to we can’t charge enough money if that is the real solution. I hope that is not the only reason.... but time after time I hear and see stories where Nutrition can have a HUGE impact and yet it is not. I am so glad to be reading books like this that cement my view that we need a change, and it gives me more confidence when talking to people about our nutritional advice. I also can see there are people out there carrying the information forward, and I hope to see it become more mainstream, and see where these theories go in the future, maybe we can win the battle against cancer.

Comment URL copied!
Joe Masley
March 2nd, 2020 at 6:41 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

The more I read from the literature in our book club, the more apparent it becomes that consensus science in the last half of the century has greatly hampered the progress of science as a whole. It's frustrating to read how the ideas of a popular, politically powerful few have snubbed out potential advances in science and medicine without scientifically rigorous evidence support their hypotheses and theories. In the both the fat-cholesterol hypothesis and then the SMT, it is clear that consensus science prevented beneficial knowledge and potential cures at the expense of those most in need.


Reading this book, it (thankfully) seems that a paradigm shift towards viewing cancer as a metabolic disease is now in motion. I am hopeful that the likes of Dr. Thomas Seyfried, Ko, and Pedersen will now finally be accepted by the medical community as the experts of cancer prevention and treatment and that their hard work can help those most in need.


This paradigm shift in how we view cancer will hopefully also move the burden of prevention/care away from health care costs and back on to the individual. For we all know that lifestyle and nutrition are what ultimately will move the needle for the majority of cancers in the right direction and we can control what we put into our bodies everyday.


Lastly, as a full-time firefighter outside of coaching CrossFit, cancer plagues our profession (my department lost three active duty members

over a 3 week span last fall due to occupational cancer). Obviously the occupational risk are higher percentage wise due to our exposure to carginogens. However (and sadly) many of my peers see cancer as an inevitable fate down the road with nothing that can be done to prevent it. I hope that this pessimistic view that they, and many others share, changes. I hope that rigorous scientific evidence supporting cancer as a metabolic disease continues to pile up and turn theory to accepted, scientific fact. I hope that seeing cancer as a metabolic disease will cause the masses to take ownership of their decisions and see cancer through the lense of a "single cause / single cure" disease that can be simply avoided by eating meats and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch, and no sugar combined with constantly varied, functional movements, at high intensity.

(edited)
Comment URL copied!
Jonathan Gary
March 2nd, 2020 at 6:00 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I am buoyed with every new or incremental improvement in cancer knowledge, treatments, and protocols; and look forward to therapies that are less toxic and provide a longer, more durable cancer-free survival rate.


I thought the Afterward of this book provided a more constructive survey of the landscape moving forward than the earlier chapters that painted a picture, to me, of two intractable camps; but then, nonetheless, ended with this (appropriate, IMO) direct quote (Kindle location 3443):


“This is not a standoff between one theory and another. Nature is under no obligation to present cancer as a genetic disease or a metabolic disease exclusively. It may be the SMT of cancer and the metabolic theory are intertwined - a chimerical monster in two realms at once.”


For example (and cursorily), the swapping of nuclei and cytosol experiments provided a simplistic glimpse into the potential effects the cytosol may have. In the same vein, the viral-free introduction of v-src to induce focal growth provides a very different conclusion (PMID 6594680)(as do the other papers where the direct introduction or alteration of genes to create immortalized cell lines has been shown). Interestingly, v-src is still being researched and in this paper (PMID 29348492) a revised mechanism of transformation is suggested. Of note, in cells that are transformed, v-src expression may result in the reduction of p21 and phospho-ERK. p21 may have a role in mitochondrial function: “results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function" (PMID 23211592). And one of the numerous functions of ERK is as a regulator mitochondrial fusion and fission (PMID 28548464). 


Additionally, keep in mind there are ALREADY numerous cancer treatments being prescribed or in trials that affect the receptor-tyrosine-kinase cascades (including insulin) involved in various aspects of metabolic regulation; these drugs act on PI3K (reducing glycolysis), AKT, and mTOR1/2. To say or imply that standard-of-care therapies do not integrate the idea that the metabolic processes in cancer cells are abnormal is a misstatement.


So, perhaps intertwined is the more constructive way to think about it. 


To see the most recent large-scale data generated from tumor sequencing, look at Nature Volume 578 Issue 7793, 6 February 2020 for five articles on research concerning more than 2,600 tumors from 38 tissues.


As for the inexpensiveness/simplicity of 3BP (that was mentioned so prominently in this work despite no trials), the formulation for general use will no doubt be more complex and therefore more expensive. The delivery mechanism for this potential therapeutic will be important, for example: it is highly reactive (e.g. blood glutathione inactivates it) and it does not appear to cross the blood brain barrier. These are not insurmountable issues with today’s technology, but ones that require development time before broader trials. Perhaps the hope of health benefits will one day push the various litigants to allow some freedom to operate.


I also look forward to more directed work assessing the clinical efficacy of ketone body (or other downstream messengers of blood glucose or calorie reduction/fasting regimens) administration to disrupt cancer cell biology rather than merely lowering blood glucose. Until then, the current standard of care is the most prudent first action. It wasn’t clear from the description in the book if the author thought/proposed/reported the lowering of blood glucose by itself had a direct effect on cancer-cell metabolism (presumably of glucose). The lowest blood glucose mentioned in the book was 50 mg/dl (or 2.8 mM) however, for malignancies that express the GLUT1 or GLUT3 transporters (Kms ~1 mM) only a limited reduction in import would be predicted.


Finally, I can appreciate the numerous metaphors used by the author in an attempt to make complex aspects of biology more approachable, so why make mistakes on small, simpler (and 100% metabolism-related) stuff? There was a recurrent pet peeve of mine: in too many (all?) instances, lactic acid was used in place of lactate - they are different (yes, by a hydrogen ion, H+, but that’s all it takes). Within the body (i.e. in the blood @pH7.4) the predominant (>99%) form is lactate. No one ever gets pyruvate wrong, hmmm… Calling it the acid results in improper conclusions as to what causes localized metabolism-derived acidification.

Comment URL copied!
Matthew Swift
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:20 pm

Jon, excuse my ignorance and basic layman's understanding, in reference to malignancies that express the GLUT1 or GLUT3 transporters, my understanding of your point is that if it is only practical to drop blood glucose levels to 50-60 mg/dl in a state of hypoglycemia (via fasting and calorie/CHO restriction), the cancers that express those two receptors will still have sufficient glucose enter the cell to allow glucose fermentation due to the ability for the receptors to still import glucose at those reduced blood glucose levels? Suggesting that the R-KD & HBOT approach may not work for those type of cancers?

Comment URL copied!
Matthew Swift
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:23 pm

.... and ... regarding the use of "Lactic Acid" throughout, which I also found annoying, do you think this was an attempt to make it more accessible for the reader? It seems strange to me that such a knowledgeable author would unintentionally confuse those terms?

Comment URL copied!
Jonathan Gary
March 3rd, 2020 at 12:06 am

Matt,

The approaches may work however, the explanation would not be a simple one (i.e. solely lowering blood sugar). For example, the presence of ketone bodies may affect glycolytic and/or Kreb's Cycle flux via several processes.

It is important to know these details to apply them to a population.

Another aspect to explain concerns metastases that traverse through the lymphatic system, where the CHO levels are lower than blood. If it was solely a CHO matter, the lymphatic system should be a stop-gap tissue - but it is not.

(edited)
Comment URL copied!
Matthew Swift
March 3rd, 2020 at 1:08 am

OK, you just sent me down a rabbit hole reading about the "reverse Warburg Effect" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3350881/

... "Consistent with the “reverse Warburg effect,” our results indicate that metastatic breast cancer cells amplify oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and that adjacent stromal cells are glycolytic and lack detectable mitochondria. Glycolytic stromal cells included cancer-associated fibroblasts, adipocytes and inflammatory cells ..... "glycolytic” cancer cells were rarely observed, indicating that the conventional “Warburg effect” does not frequently occur in cancer-positive lymph node metastases."

(edited)
Comment URL copied!
Jonathan Gary
March 3rd, 2020 at 3:20 am

Surprise... human biology is not simple or straightforward ;)

Comment URL copied!
Zachary Forrest
March 3rd, 2020 at 7:08 pm

Great stuff, John!

I've always held belief that cancer should be viewed as a symptom, not disease. The quote from the Afterward appeases me in that regard, as it gives the possibility that there is some merit to that stance.


I was slightly confused as to the purpose of your next points...were they to support the Warburg effect? Although I have yet to delve into the papers you cited, I would think the nuclei/cytosol experiments as well as the v-src (viral-free introduction? does the paper explain the mechanism for delivery?) all resulted in the same end-game state of a mitochondrial dysfunction...which is WE, correct?


Side note: The semantics surrounding the usage of Lactic Acid vs. Lactate did annoy me...especially because, as far as I understand it, Lactic Acid isn't present in the human body. At all.



Comment URL copied!
Benjamin Tausch
March 2nd, 2020 at 3:22 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Ich fande das Buch eher ein medizinisches Fachbuch als ein Buch für den "normalen" Leser. Sehr umfangreich, viele Fachbegriffe. Vielleicht bei nächsten Buch ein bisschen ein Buch mit kleinerem Umfang auswählen ;-)

Comment URL copied!
Joe Alexander
March 2nd, 2020 at 2:40 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Having zero education in cancer treatment, I greatly enjoyed this book, particularly Chapter 3, Breakthroughs and Disappointments. I was intensely interested in Pedersen and Ko's journey to the discovery of the efficacy of 3-bromopyruvate and it's potential to disrupt tumor metabolism. Ko's relentlessness is everything you could hope for in the field of cancer research; truly inspirational. I leave this book hopeful of the future work of Seyfried, Pedersen, D'Agostino, Ko, and those who follow their lead. As Seyfried says, imagine a treatment for cancer that was not only safe and cost effective, but ultimately enhances the health of the patient!

Comment URL copied!
Jessica Pilling
March 2nd, 2020 at 1:55 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

I've had this book on my shelf for over a year, but having lost my mom to pancreatic cancer in 2015, I knew it would be hard for me to read. 5 years ago we were sitting speaking to the oncologist and the doctor gave her a grim outlook with 6 months and a chemo plan, along with "eat milkshakes or whatever tastes good" to my mom. I knew this was wrong, I questioned him and had done some of my own research (not knowing about this book then) on how cancer feeds off of sugar. I felt validated that I wasn't a crazy CrossFit crazed daughter, that "cancer is the replacement of the respiration of oxygen in normal body cells by fermentation of sugar" He flat out told us "that will not help". I was angry and stayed angry for a long time. The end of this book, an oncologist shared his thoughts, ....oncologists go to school to help people, 'they come out [of school] arrogant' and....[many of their patient die in the first year]many become disenchanted and stop trying, they lose heart and just settle into the standard of care". They are human, just like us, and they began down this path because they DO care and want to change the world, just like us, as trainers.

I have already passed this book onto one of my athletes, her mom began treatment for ovarian cancer last week and she is told to get tested for the BRCA mutation testing and is afraid. I encouraged her to skip through the first half and get to the how: the nutrition, fasting and keto. Something so simple, and it seems to always go back to: Nutrition. I feel more hopeful than ever. Each day is a choice and a step in the right direction by choosing real, whole foods to further than hedge against sickness. Food is medicine. We've got a lot of work to do in our affiliates, to continue to educate on the truth.

Comment URL copied!
Nancy Bodet
March 2nd, 2020 at 1:48 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Thank you for featuring this very important book. I look forward to reading it and appreciate the comments above.

Comment URL copied!
Melissa Reed
March 2nd, 2020 at 12:00 pm
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Yet again after reading our book club book I find myself increasingly frustrated with our medical system. A system I am a part of and had complete faith in. A system that I have come to realize is broken, and unfortunately has prioritized money. Cancer as a metabolic disease is not a profitable one.


I have heard first hand a Physician telling my family member that lifestyle changes, while “good” will not help in the treatment of early stage cancer. I have seen soda being served to very sick inpatients in a hospital, diabetics and cancer patients being fed processed carbs on top of processed carb in this same hospital.


Prior to reading this book I witnessed firsthand a good friend decide to fight cancer holistically thru nutrition. Specifically a keto diet protocol along with infusions of vitamin c, and other natural treatments. At first I thought she was nuts...after all we are led to believe surgery, chemo, and radiation are the ONLY options. I am so happy to report this friend is now 100% cancer free! I was excited to dive into this book and learn more!


While I found myself frustrated, especially after learning the road blocks 3BP and the Warburg effect have had...I am hopeful of the potential these have as a treatment for cancer.


lastly, I was pleased to see the resource section at the end. A place to see where we can find Drs and researchers near us for help, as well as institutions we can help support monetarily instead of more money to a non productive cancer institute.

Comment URL copied!
Michele Mootz
March 3rd, 2020 at 9:52 pm

Melissa-


I had a similar response to this book. That "yet again" moment of having verification that our medical system really is as bad as we think it is. I suppose if we think of all this research as chipping away at the iceberg...we really are getting somewhere, just not very quickly.

Like many of the comments, I too have had multiple family members who have experienced cancer first hand. Most would tell you that the experience is a blur because the fear takes over everything else. The half heard conversations with doctors that left them confused and unaware of options. The pessimist in me thinks maybe that is by design, but I hope I am wrong.

I walked away from this read thinking of this book as a guidebook for anyone stuck in the medical cog. I realize that cancer is the predominant theme, but the experiences of those dealing with the broken medical system may share very similar experiences even with a very different diagnosis.

Travis Christofferson highlights failure of the medical and research communities to provide any promising roadmaps for curing cancer. That ultimately can be said for many of the chronic diseases that plague our society today. Just as cancer has no boundaries in who it impacts...the ineffective and ultimately dangerous lack of knowledge in medicine is just as far reaching.

Comment URL copied!
marcus mcclain
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:11 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Warburg, stated "Cancer, above all other diseases, has countless secondary causes. But, even for cancer, there is only one prime cause. Summarized in a few words, the prime cause of cancer is the replacement of the respiration of oxygen in normal body cells by a fermentation of sugar." (Christofferson, T. 2014). I can't stop thinking about this statement and how we introduce the Nutrition lecture, the single most powerful element we can control is what we put into our mouths. How many people are unassumingly eating foods that are increasing their risk for Cancer and not even knowing it? How many people are in Medical Facilities trying to recover from Cancer or other Chronic Diseases but are being served foods that are only fueling these diseases instead of helping people recover from these diseases. Furthermore do the makers or suppliers of these foods want this to be known, I am sure they don't want people to be stricken with Cancer but if there is not solid or mainstream publicity citing sugar laden foods or highly processed foods being part of the issue then most people are not going to be aware of this. Understanding that the cells are very good at auto regulating the amount of glucose entering them, but when cancer is present, the flood gates are left open and the cells can no longer auto regulate or control the amount of glucose coming. Eating foods high in Carbs or sugar dense only worsens this condition. Continuing to educate the public on the dangers of highly processed and sugar laden foods and drinks is a must. As mentioned in the book getting Cancer to look more like a stationary target instead of a moving target, could be perhaps easier achieved if we were to focus on the foods we eat, eliminating the haze to per say may allow the cancer cells to actively and effectively be targeted, resulting in better chances of survival and/or the development of Cancer.

Comment URL copied!
Zachary Forrest
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:07 pm

Marcus - that line, early on the in the book, is what grabbed at me also. In my opinion, it set an essential perspective for rest of the book.


To your point about nutrition: the ~$120 billion GLOBAL cancer research industry is dwarfed by the ~$700 billion US food industry. The food industry in our single country is nearly 5 times bigger than cancer research on the entire planet.


It's quite depressing to think about how this is weighed, but you're right...the fight needs to happen on two fronts, with the education to the public happening through as many mediums as we can possibly manage. If people are educated on the primary cause of Cancer more readily coupled with a primer on it's relation to certain patterns of eating, we may see less people get cancer.


I think the fight here is more easily one in the cancer research community, partially because it's filled with *slightly* less beuracratic and, hopefully, more objective people (*shrug*).

Comment URL copied!
Emily Jenkins
March 2nd, 2020 at 6:59 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

Tripping Over the Truth could be added to the

resources list of Friday’s post “The Cancer Industry: Hype vs. Reality”. The “eureka”

moment that Christofferson describes early on in the book has to do with an experiment

in 1976 that seemed to unify the pieces of the somatic mutation theory (SMT). This

concept provided the foundation needed to lead the charge against cancer, with

an impressive swiftness. Few scientists and medical professionals were bold

enough to dig deeper and question the flawed theory. Fast-forward nearly five

decades, and we see important work exposing SMT as unsound, based on a model

that determines cancer as a condition with defective metabolism at the cellular

level. Warbarg laid the foundation of this theory in the 1920’s, but was unable

to prove his theory, his observations became eclipsed as the promise of SMT energized

the scientific community.


The “hype” surrounding the SMT theory had to do with the potential

to cure cancer once the DNA of the cancer site could be sequenced, and certain,

predictable, mutations identified and corrected. The problem with this is that

once scientists began sequencing the DNA of a whole host of different types of

cancer cells, they were unable to identify logical patterns in cancer

mutations.


The “reality” seems to bring Warbarg’s identification of

cancer’s defective metabolism back to the foreground in an effort to better

understand the nature of the disease. Christofferson outlines the how and why

of studies concerning cancer as a metabolic issue. Then, he goes on to describe

the promise of nascent metabolic therapies. Finally, he tells readers about a

few experimental cases where patients have shown success in combating “cancer’s

grotesquely voracious appetite for glucose” implementing a ketogenic diet in

conjunction with conventional cancer treatments. While metabolic therapies have

a long road ahead, in order to raise funds for clinical trials and obtain FDA

approvals, the press-pulse approach could provide a lot of hope for a lot of

people looking for a less barbaric approach to combating cancer.

Comment URL copied!
Matthieu Dubreucq
March 2nd, 2020 at 3:45 am
Commented on: Tripping Over the Truth

For me this book was a easy read in terms of style but a really hard read in terms of it’s message.  Having lost my mother 8 years ago to breast cancer (after a 15 year battle) I could see that a lot of this paradigm shift from SMT to the Metabolic Theory of Cancer could have greatly benefit her.  


I think that the science available to discredit the SMT is enough to at lease give the choice to patients between a toxic v.s. non toxic possible treatments in the cases we now know that we haven’t improve life expectancy since the 1950.  Who, when given the choice really want the last 6 months of their life puking in a bucket, no energy, miserable for the same terrible outcome : death.  


This book offer HOPE that when talked a different way we can, we will find a cure for this monster.  If you are a professional in oncology or a patient I urge you to revisit the Warburg effect. 


Some eye openers for me : 


1. If you understand what a PET scan works you understand that a tumor that grows uses massive amount of glucose.  


2. If you document yourself on the sequential of the genome of Cancer you also understand that the theory of Cancer originating from one cell having a couple of mutation and cloning itself to form a Tumor doesn’t had up.  Most of cells from the same Tumor in the same patient are completely different.  


3. If you deprive a cell of oxygen, in a matter of a couple of hours it becomes a cancer cell : a cell that most it’s ATP comes from fermentation. 


4. Cancer cells have broken mitochondria.  Apoptosis is turned off and the cell becomes immortel. 


5. I cannot wait for things to settle with 3BP and see if this drug that plays on metabolism can save more lives.  


The recommandations on how to beat cancer at the end using a synergy of methods to cure seems to me like the better approach.  If cancer turns out to be a metabolic disease it is the beginning of the end for this monster.  Understanding the physiologie of the disease and it’s weak spot is key.  


Go keto to remove the cancer’s fuel and then attack cancer when it’s weak.  Evolution made our cell the cells that are stronger, cancer cells are weaker let’s stop viewing them as super cells!

Comment URL copied!
marcus mcclain
March 2nd, 2020 at 10:22 am

Hi Matt

Thank you for sharing and sorry for your loss. When or ever do you think Medical Facility dinning halls or meals being served will look more like Keto and not the processed stuff that is being served now. Is this possible, I am sure it would change the healing and inflammation seen in patients but in terms of cost and preparation this would be a massive change.

Comment URL copied!
Jobst Olschewski
March 2nd, 2020 at 11:03 pm

I am sorry for your loss, Matt. I can absolutely sympathize with your thoughts: Having been diagnosed late, my father lost a long, painful battle and his life to cancer over ten years ago. Around that time, I discovered CrossFit and since then I have been exposed more and more to the benefits of our CrossFit lifestyle and its effect on cancer and other diseases.


Just like you, I regret that the information I only have now might have helped my father back then. Tripping over the truth is a first read for me and although some information I had already come across over time, I found it very useful in joining much of the legitimate information available on the topic and (despite the heavy topic) creating an easily readable book that gives a good starting point for anyone wanting to know about cancer and how to combat it. The book reads like a time travel through cancer discoveries and research that still lead to SMT as the long-time prevailing theory, as well as the evolution of diverse treatment therapies over time. Interestingly, coming full-circle to Warburg’s discoveries that had for a long time been dismissed by most, as well as non-toxic treatments including nutrition as alternatives to SMT. 


A few noted "highlights" along the way:

  • “The preclinical experiments, case studies, and trials that have been done thus far exhibit incredible promise, as do the anecdotal stories that span the country. The problem is money. Because metabolic cancer treatment is so cheap, ironically, it is difficult to get funding” (p. 177) Given the gravity of the topic, this is saddening. Although it seems to be on par with a reality that Big Pharma and Big Soda are part of.
  • Appendix A (p. 206) – How to get started: The book would work without it, but I like that there is a chapter that talks about taking action.
  • References (p. 222) – Although, I did not manage to dig deep here, yet, this looks like a well organized starting point for reference on any topic discussed.


Overall, I am excited that despite many pages of head-shaking about how things have taken a wrong direction along the way, I like that the positive outlook the book has in the end. It gives me confidence that we are moving in the right direction, closer to the truth.

Comment URL copied!
Alexander Mercieca
May 12th, 2021 at 2:52 pm

Sorry for your loss Matt. This book really hit home for me as well. My youngest daughter was diagnosed with neruoblastoma at 19 months and my wife was diagnosed with Stage 3C breast cancer back in September of 2020. I got a lot of good take-aways from the book and some of the information allowed us both to communicate with the doctors better. On another note, the information provided raised some questions that our doctors could not really give us straight answers to, which was a little concerning.

Comment URL copied!