CrossFit | 200127
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200127

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3

Rest Day

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Ernst Peibst
June 24th, 2021 at 3:46 am
Commented on: 200127

Serge Nubret was known to skip breakfast in the 70's and he was known to be more health conscious than many other bodybuilders in this era. Also looked incredible and more toned than many of his rivals

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Ernst Peibst
March 3rd, 2020 at 1:53 pm
Commented on: 200127


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Ernst Peibst
March 3rd, 2020 at 1:53 pm
Commented on: 200127


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lea ale
February 24th, 2020 at 4:32 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Thank you very much for that. Maybe the best breakfast (we say petit déjeuner in french) has to be a mix of the best nutriments we have to eat all time with more proteins like it s said here

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Mehmet Sevinc
February 3rd, 2020 at 9:54 pm
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

Rob Lawson, Angei and Raif thanks for everything you all are perfect coach. My aim is to be a coach like yours. I like, fun, learn I did eveyrhing with you. It is very usefull course.

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Jeffrey Baker
February 1st, 2020 at 7:20 am
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

The Crossfit Level 2 seminar put on by Dave Eubanks and Zach Forrest at Double Edge Fitness in Reno was a great experience for all involved. They were very professional and eloquent during the lectures and always tried to steer us to uncover truths on our own. They were also very hand-on with their coaching and you could tell that they really cared about what they were teaching us. I had a great time learning from Dave and Zach and getting to know a lot of the local coaches form around town!

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Marcos Rivera
January 29th, 2020 at 9:29 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Good read. Appreciate the humor, "Doing what all good doctors do..." Often times we find it difficult to practice what we preach so some humility shows the human element.


But what came of you? Guess that is in part II?

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Terence Kealey
January 29th, 2020 at 11:44 pm

Thanks Marcos, the answer is this: thanks to my glocometer (the use of which, can you imagine!!!, was not recommended for type 2 diabetics in the British national health service 10 years ago) I rapidly discovered that skipping breakfast and avoiding carbohydrates but enjoying some wine with supper (alcohol inhibits glucose release from the liver) put my blood levels happily in the pre-diabetic range. I'd essentially reversed my condition (& I think that if I worked at my desk less, and concentrated on my diet more, and take even more exercise, I could do even better--but my doctors are v happy with and for me, and I take only metformin and a statin).

not bad for someone who was told on diagnosis I'd be on insulin in 6 months!

When that reversal first happened, 10 years ago, my doctor was outraged because, he said, only 1% of patients achieved that, yet I'd done all the things he'd told me not to do. "doesn't that make you think?" I asked.

"No" he said, "these are the NICE guidelines." [National Institute of Clinical Excellence or something like that] which I found a bit discombobulating.

anyway, my story is now commonplace as people increasingly go carbohydrate-free, but then it seemed pioneering.

btw, when my glucose levels stray, a few days of vegan diet correct that. But most of the time I can be carnivorous if I wish.

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David Mitchell
January 29th, 2020 at 4:48 am
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

Crossfit Level 2 was an amazing experience. Great feedback and the tools and concepts presented by Chuck, Lindsay and Fern were perfect! Can’t wait to bring this back to our members and take their experience to the next level!!

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Joseph Stuart Conlin
January 28th, 2020 at 6:07 pm
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

Kids CrossFit in Portland at CrossFit XFactor was amazing! Great instructors and location.

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jr Wild
January 28th, 2020 at 2:24 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Interesting story, looking forward to continuation.

Another puzzling stydy on breakfast

Jacobowicz et.all www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23512957


Overweight people ate same (restricted) calories of 1400 kcal either beakfast -emphasized or dinner -emphasized. So 700-500-200 kcal was delivering good results + weight loss, in comparison to 2-5-7 with heavy dinner.


All measures glucose, insulin, HOMA-ir, triglyserades improved within the heavy breakfast group.


The group concluded: breakfast -heavy eating style is supposedly good for metabolic syndrome or obesity therapy.


Can't get my head around this. Eating "against nature" or at least against insulin resistence is good? The storage form in the evening really stores the dinner energy? As designed for hunter-garherers?


Writing this as a recent (2y) breakfast skipper, not just hungry any more. No willpower exercised nor needed.

JR

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Terence Kealey
January 28th, 2020 at 11:36 pm

Thank you. I've written about this group and their studies before (Breakfast is a Dangerous Meal, 2016, 4th Estate, UK, pp 91-95). What they've done in this particular study is to put their subjects on a weight-loss diet, which raises free fatty acid levels (which they did not measure or report in this study, unless I've stupidly overlooked them.) When free fatty acid levels are raised, breakfast remains a dangerous meal but dinner becomes even more dangerous. But that is only a temporary phenomenon while subjects are fasting and losing weight. But when subjects revert to stable weights, then dinner also reverts to being safe.

It's a shame I think that these authors did not measure circulating free fatty acid levels, because that would have made it so much easier to understand what is going on. It's also a shame I think that these authors attribute so much to circadian rhythms when a much simpler explanation--FFAs--are there to be found.

So the rule remains: for day-to-day life, breakfast should be avoided (unless you're one of those people who absolutely needs it and if you're slim and fit and free of blood sugar problems).

But if you're losing weight, then dinner will become temporarily an even more dangerous meal than breakfast, so then and then alone should dinner be the meal to avoid.

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jr Wild
May 14th, 2020 at 8:42 pm

Hope you are still there, prof. Kealey.

Read your book and checked those three jakubowicz studies. Soon I settled with pictures only. The text and logic is fishy.


They focus primarily on glucose reactions, while feeding td2 people (or pre D) with min 46% carbs. They are happy when the insulin reaction is greater! They seem to think lipolysis is a bad thing (using lipogenesis as a term). Similarily, they like bigger glp1 reaction. Like they get everything upside down, and repeat the same bs with the same team, over and over.


Not anymore so confused, thanks for guidance.

JR

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Emily Jenkins
January 28th, 2020 at 7:38 am
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Thanks for this article. I’m curious about this recommendation of skipping breakfast as a blanket statement to combat trends we are seeing in the US. Dr. Kealey, do you think some individuals will thrive on eating breakfast? Say, modern day “laborers”. I would like to know to what extent you are reaching with this recommendation. Thank you.

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Terence Kealey
January 28th, 2020 at 10:54 pm

Thank you. I think my point is this: to thine own self be true. The curse of 'breakfast is the most important meal of the day' and 'breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dine like a pauper' is that it encourages people to eat breakfast when they're not hungry, out of a sense of metabolic 'duty.' So if you're not hungry in the morning, then don't eat breakfast! But if you are, then of course you must (though a person can still go easy on the carbs.) And if you're a 'labourer' and function better with breakfast then--again--do; but--again--don't eat just because someone says you should: eat only if you're hungry.

An astonishing number of us are pre-diabetic or diabetic, and there's no doubt that if we can lower weights across the population (& skipping breakfast is such an easy way to do so) we'd be healthier as a population.

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Emily Jenkins
February 6th, 2020 at 1:15 pm

Thank you for clarifying. I think it is important to note that skipping breakfast can be a useful "hack" for a certain population but does not mean that you must skip in order to be healthy. Thanks again, I'm looking forward to reading Part 2!

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Thiago Martinez
January 28th, 2020 at 2:01 am
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

Sem palavras pra agradecer toda equipe do L2 deste final de semana na Crossfit SP.( Jobst, Victor, Pablo e Vivi ). Em 2012 fiz meu L1 em 2015 fiz meu 1 L2 e em 2020 fiz a revalidacao do L2 muito inspirador e preparatorio para a prova do L3. Obrigado de coração a todos da equipe e a Crossfit por proporcionar essas atualizações.

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Jobst Olschewski
January 30th, 2020 at 5:35 pm

Thiago que legal ter vc neste curso hístorico. Muito obrigado para suas palavras. Seu feedback vale muito para nos. Muito sucesso para seu futuro como treinador, tudo de bom para o L3 e até logo!

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Mick Reynolds
January 27th, 2020 at 11:47 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

I've got diabetes, for which I'm taking pills (metformin), and slow and fast acting insulin, in addition to working out at 6am most mornings (go CrossFit !nconceivable). When I wake up, my blood sugars are usually on the rise, after being stable overnight. I compensate with some insulin before working out, but many mornings my blood sugar is higher after the workout than it was before, with no carb intake. What gives?

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Terence Kealey
January 28th, 2020 at 10:45 pm

Yup, you're right to be puzzled. Most people tend to go hypo after exercise, for reasons that are obvious, but some people tend to go hyper as glucagon and adrenaline kick in and drive glucose out of the liver. All anyone can do is to recognise that everyone is different and to determine what functions for them. But working out remains a very good idea!

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Embriette Hyde
January 27th, 2020 at 11:05 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Thank you for this enjoyable, interesting article. I learned a few things I hadn't known before! But one thing I can say is that I've personally benefited from skipping breakfast. I used to struggle with low blood sugar unless I ate every three hours. I've been intermittent fasting for over a year now, and never suffer from shakiness, headaches, or anything else I used to experience from low blood sugar. I haven't actually measured my numbers, but based on how I feel I think it's safe to say that my blood sugar has stabilized. I even feel better working out fasted -- as if I were lighter, less weighed down.

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Terence Kealey
January 28th, 2020 at 10:38 pm

This is really good news, and I think some people really do get a hypo dip after their blood sugar levels rise so high after breakfast. You wld seem to be one of those people

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Juan Arroyo
January 27th, 2020 at 10:16 pm
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

Gran curso L1 en Zapopan, Mexico, muy buenos Coaches del Seminario, Carlos, Tefy, Gabo y Marta, Gracias. Excelente experiencia y Ambiente

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Carlos Andrade
February 3rd, 2020 at 9:44 pm

Gracias a ti Juan!

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Derrick Antoniak
January 27th, 2020 at 7:07 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Interesting read. However, in May 2010 I had just finished my 2nd year of medical school, and none of the dietary recommendations given to you match what I had learned of metabolism and nutrition to that point.

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Mary Dan Eades
January 27th, 2020 at 10:35 pm

Derrick ~ As a physician who graduated 40 years ago, I can attest that we got a good grounding in biochemistry, however, we got (precisely) 3 hours (by which I do not mean credit hours, but rather actual hours on the clock) of 'nutrition'. And that amounted to a single lecture on how to write orders for 'low cholesterol diet', 'low fat diet', 'bland diet', 'low residue diet' etc etc. We, who were interested in the topic, were forced to dig out our own nutritional education over the intervening years as autodidacts, and I, for one, would love to know what they are teaching med students nowadays in nutrition. Would you mind expanding a bit on what they're teaching you now? Your comment that what you're learning doesn't at all jibe with what Dr. Kealey's initial diabetic treatment was, makes curious about what's being taught now. Would you comment further? Thanks!

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Terence Kealey
January 28th, 2020 at 10:36 pm

Thank you Derrick. What were you then taught? In those days people were still taught that type 2 diabetes was invariably progressive, but we now know a low-calorie and/or a low carbohydrate diet can in many cases reverse it. But I agree with Dr Eades that physicians were simply not then taught a nutritional science that made sense or which was even based on biochemistry, so I'd be grateful for your comments.

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marcus mcclain
January 27th, 2020 at 5:05 pm
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

CrossFit Barbell bester Gastgeber! Schön wars mit euch allen!!


Mac

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Emmanuel Chibuikem
January 27th, 2020 at 3:05 pm
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

i love the way you analyzed the reasons why we have these conceptions.

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Terence Kealey
January 28th, 2020 at 11:37 pm

Thank you Candice, Amedeo and Emmanuel

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Fernando Santos
January 27th, 2020 at 9:30 am
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

CrossFit SP, São Paulo- Brasil L2.

obrigado a equipe que ministrou o curso L2 em São Paulo com maestria. Jobst, Victor, Pablo e Vivi obrigado pelo fim de semana de aprendizado e continuem difundindo o conhecimento.

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Jobst Olschewski
January 27th, 2020 at 5:58 pm

Fernando que legal passar o fim de semana com voce e essa turma maravilhosa. Obrigado pela su mensagem, tudo de bom para frente e ate logo!

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Amedeo Alessio Cerea
January 27th, 2020 at 9:13 am
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Pure truth

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Fabrizio Neri
January 27th, 2020 at 7:56 am
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

Reebok CrossFit Parma, Italy.

L1 Course has been awesome with you guys !! Beautifull group!

Couldn't ask for better instructos. They have demonstrate that a GREAT coach can make miracles happen!!!

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Marco Ferrari
January 27th, 2020 at 10:20 pm

Grazie Fabri !!!

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Federico Biasetti
January 28th, 2020 at 2:27 am

Grande Fabri!!! Complimenti per il muscle up!!!

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Candice Theron
January 27th, 2020 at 7:21 am
Commented on: The Story of Breakfast, Part 1

Excellent article, I enjoyed reading about the history behind these assumptions and myths.

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Ches Tucker
January 27th, 2020 at 2:19 am
Commented on: Course Photos | Jan. 20 - 26, 2020

CrossFit Lubbock L1 - Abi, Camille, and Doug...y’all killed it! Thanks for swinging down to West Texas!

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Camille Acton
January 28th, 2020 at 6:37 pm

Thank you, Ches, it was a pleasure. Thanks for your help and hospitality!

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Abigail Grove
January 30th, 2020 at 7:22 pm

Thank you for showing us the classic West Texas charm and hospitality! I loved finally getting to see your spot!

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