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CrossFit Health is an investigation into the ills of modern medicine and the wilful abuse of the public’s trust in science. The lessons learned from the legal dismantling of fake science, a crooked journal, and perjuring scientists have given us a forensic view as to how everything might have gone so wrong. We’re calling the combination of runaway medical costs and disease rates–which many profit from but none combat effectively—“The Mess.”

This 2019 piece documents the work of English anesthetist John Carlisle, who has developed and used statistical methods to identify published research papers with questionable results. Carlisle’s work has found data issues within and outside the anesthesiological research space and has led to high-profile retractions, such as that of the PREDIMED, a study that drove increased interest in the Mediterranean diet in 2013.

Read MoreHow A Data Detective Exposed Suspicious Medical Trials

Dr. Maryanne Demasi earned a Ph.D. in rheumatology from the University of Adelaide, but perhaps the most formative experience she had with the medical sciences occurred while she was an investigative journalist with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). During her tenure with the ABC, she produced a two-part series called “Heart of the Matter,” which challenged the role of cholesterol in heart disease and addressed the overprescription of statin drugs. The fallout from the series was not swift, but it was decisive. In this presentation, delivered on June 8, 2019, at a CrossFit Health event at CrossFit Headquarters, Demasi shares her personal experiences and the challenges she faced while trying to relay the limitations of statin data to the public.

Watch Dr. Maryanne Demasi: My Experience of Exposing the Statin Con

Dr. Zoë Harcombe has become an expert in the corruption and error plaguing the health sciences — a dire situation that she, like CrossFit Founder Greg Glassman, refers to as “The Mess.” Harcombe defines “The Mess” as “the escalating disease (and) the escalating medical costs, which many people are profiting from but none are combatting effectively.” During a presentation delivered on July 31 at the 2019 CrossFit Health Conference, Harcombe outlined many factors that contribute to this growing problem — specifically, the role of dietitians and the food and beverage industry in influencing how and what we eat, accreditation that regulates who can offer dietary advice, and the disparity between what we are told to eat and what the evidence suggests we should eat.

Watch Dr. Zoë Harcombe on the Mess: The Money Vs. the Evidence

Australia’s most iconic health charity, the National Heart Foundation (NHF), has partnered with cereal giant Sanitarium to promote the health benefits of Sanitarium’s cholesterol-lowering Weet-Bix. The NHF’s endorsement of the product and Sanitarium’s marketing campaign for the cereal both are based upon health benefits found in a single study — funded and performed by Sanitarium. Dr. Maryanne Demasi discusses this obvious conflict of interest and shares scholars’ responses. As Dr. Zoë Harcombe has observed, “People can't trust that which has been paid for.”

Read MoreIs Advice From The Heart Foundation Trustworthy?

Commercial interests have discovered numerous ways to co-opt the loyalty of health professionals to promote company-sponsored studies and marketing messages. Here, Dr. Maryanne Demasi describes just a few of the indications that Australia’s National Heart Foundation (NHF) has sold its soul to industry. She focuses specifically on the NHF’s ties to junk food and pharmaceutical companies, citing responses from various scholars who have expressed deep concern over how the NHF’s receipt of industry funding might threaten public health.

Read MoreHas the Australian NHF Sold Its Soul?

Dr. Maryanne Demasi worked as a journalist and producer for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) for 11 years. In 2013, she produced a two-part series called “Heart of the Matter,” which challenged the role of cholesterol in heart disease and addressed the overprescription of statin drugs. The series received excellent ratings and was praised by ABC management for being “superbly presented” and “provocative.” Over time, however, reception became less favorable. Demasi attributes the shift to the media storm stirred by those with vested interests in statins. Here, she shares her story and explains why the fallout is indicative of a “crisis of democracy” in the sciences.

Read MoreScience and censorship — my story

Scientists continue to discover evidence of the therapeutic value of nutritional ketosis for a range of conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and cancer. Dr. Dominic D’Agostino, an Associate Professor of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida, is at the forefront of research related to the use of ketosis for cancer treatment. During a presentation on July 31, 2019, at the annual CrossFit Health Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, D’Agostino shared his knowledge of the health benefits associated with ketones and presented his latest research on ketosis as an adjuvant treatment for high-grade glioma.

Watch Dr. Dominic D’Agostino: Emerging Applications of Nutritional Ketosis

“I think there is a vast myth that scientists are somehow objective and honest,” Dr. Terence Kealey said during a presentation at a CrossFit Health event at CrossFit Headquarters on March 9, 2019. During his presentation, Kealey discussed the myth of scientific objectivity, drawing examples widely from history as well as his personal experiences within many of the most reputable scientific institutions. “We commit to paradigms, and then we bend the data to it,” Kealey explained. “Now, you get money not for being right; you get money for satisfying the prejudices of the people who sit on the committees in the NIH and NSF.”

Watch Dr. Terence Kealey and the Myth of Scientific Objectivity

Dr. Maryanne Demasi lists several examples that indicate people have steadily been losing confidence in the medical sciences and professions since the 1980s. She also presents a few factors she believes have contributed to the trend. For instance, President Ronald Reagan’s defunding of the NIH and private industry's subsequent infiltration of the medical sciences have led to a litany of corrupt practices that have exacerbated the problem and put lives at risk, she explains.

Read MoreIn science we trust — or do we?

Dr. Jason Fung, MD, is a nephrologist and expert in the use of intermittent fasting and low-carbohydrate diets for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. In this presentation, delivered on Aug. 2, 2018, at the 2018 CrossFit Health Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, Fung shares his first-hand experiences with “The Mess” in the medical sciences and discusses how he shifted his research and clinical practices as a result of those experiences. He explains why long-term weight loss is so difficult, introduces the concept of therapeutic fasting, and dispels common myths associated with the fasting process.

WatchDr. Jason Fung: Fasting as a Therapeutic Option for Weight Loss

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