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Category: LEO/Mil

Posted on July 5, 2007 in LEO/Mil

shane

3. EXECUTION

a. Concept of Operations

(1) Intent. Complete as many rounds of the exercises in 20 minutes as possible in a safe manner. This is a four-person-team team "time-specific" workout. The purpose of this workout is to develop cohesion and combat fitness under fatigue conditions through shared hardship, challenges, and competition.

(2) Scheme of Maneuver. The platoon will be divided into as many teams of four as possible. Each team will require a wall or other stable object to conduct the inverted burpees against. All teams will start at the same time. Each exercise must be completed before moving to the next one (all 8 inverted burpees must be finished before starting the squats and all squats finished before starting the burpees). The soldiers can take a rest at any time during the workout. Each team has to complete as many rounds as possible in the 20 minutes. The total number of complete rounds for each team member will be added together to obtain the total score for the team. For example, if soldier "A" completes 12 rounds, soldier "B" 15 rounds, soldier "C" 13 rounds, and soldier "D" 9, the total score for the team would be 49. Spotting is not permitted at any time.

(3) Main Effort. The safety of all personnel, and the development of unit cohesion and combat fitness through shared challenge and hardship.

(4) End State. The safe and successful completion of all exercises.

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Posted on May 3, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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As much as we CrossFitters enjoy being able to get online to CrossFit.com to see what new challenge Coach has for us in the Workout of the Day (WOD), we don’t have that luxury every day. Work, deployments, and life all disrupt even the most carefully planned schedule, and sometimes we find ourselves far removed from even basic exercise facilities. If you too find yourself in this situation, rather than putting your fitness on hold (and letting it decline) until you get back to civilization, consider the following suggestions to maintain or even improve your GPP (general physical preparedness) while you are enjoying the great outdoors.

Work, deployments, and life all disrupt even the most carefully planned schedule...

Do yourself a favor now and copy down a few months’ worth of WODs from the archives. Keep them on disk or in a small notebook, and don’t leave home without it. If you are able, make up a small portable workout kit. I always try to bring at least one set of rings, a small pair of parallettes, a 55-pound dumbbell, and a stopwatch. With my notebook (filled with past completed WODs, times, scores, and, more importantly, techniques I have used in the past to substitute equipment or exercises in order to participate in the WOD), my travel kit is complete. Now when I hit the ground, I need only time, a small space, and a positive attitude to get a good workout —if not always “as prescribed.”

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Posted on April 25, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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After nearly a year assigned to Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron-41/AIMD, I began to sense a restlessness among the assigned Marines and sailors. Cynicism and complacency were setting in. Their respective influences were eroding morale within our organization. We needed a vehicle that contradicted the normal, more accepted types of physical fitness (and problem solving). I felt that only an unconventional approach would reinforce the bonds of teamwork, solidify trust, foster responsibility, and rebuild individual/team accountability. The Monster Mash (a program introduced to me in college by a Navy SEAL) was the prescription.

I sent out Warning Orders, “invitations” so to speak, hand-selecting most of the participants initially. By design, I didn’t make the training convenient. Drills commenced on Friday afternoons after everyone had gone home or to the local watering hole for happy hour. Response at first was a bit sketchy, but there was at least some interest. So, on a cold, rainy afternoon, our first Monster Mash began. Dressed in utility uniforms and boots, the drills ranged from heavy bouts of calisthenics to crawling through a muddy trench numerous times. We also implemented martial arts techniques and as the afternoon wore on, most of the lads wore out.

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Posted on April 14, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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What does CrossFit training have in common with Stoic philosophy and the story of an American Prisoner Of War (POW)? Mental toughness. The ability to tolerate discomfort for a higher purpose. The strength of will to not be broken by adversity. Of course, the demands of a CrossFit workout can’t compare in intensity to being tortured as a POW for military secrets, but it does compare in kind. CrossFit is all about scalability. As Coach has always said, the demands of an elite athlete are different from a deconditioned senior only in degree and not in kind.

Vice Admiral (VADM) James B. Stockdale, United States Navy (retired, b.1923-), was the senior-ranking Naval Officer within the Vietnamese prison camp system. He spent nearly eight years as a POW, four of which were in solitary confinement, cloaked in total darkness. His imprisonment was one of the longest such ordeals in American history. How did he survive the torture, the isolation, and the uncertainty of his future?

Before answering the question, is the relevance to CrossFit already obvious? If you read the daily WOD (Workout Of the Day) comments, the sense of torture, isolation and uncertainty are definitely present. Again, the intensity and degree of suffering of a WOD are self-chosen and ultimately fun (“It doesn’t have to be fun to be fun”), whereas the intensity and suffering of a POW are frankly unimaginable in comparison. Our hats are off in gratitude for all those who serve our country, especially the POWs.

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Posted on March 26, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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This is the story of how a small group of soldiers used “unconventional warfare” (UW) to bring CrossFit to 1st Battalion 1st Special Force Group, Torii Station, Japan.

Insurgency is a condition of subversive political activity, civil rebellion, revolt, or insurrection against a duly constituted government or occupying power wherein irregular forces are formed and engage in actions, which may include guerrilla warfare, that are designed to weaken and overthrow that government or occupying power.
Unconventional warfare is a broad spectrum of military and paramilitary operations, normally of long duration and conducted predominantly by indigenous or surrogate forces that are organized, trained, equipped, supported, and directed in varying degrees by an external source. It includes guerrilla warfare and other direct-offensive low-visibility, covert, or clandestine operations, as well as the indirect activities of subversion, sabotage, intelligence activities, and evasion and escape (E&E).

There are three prerequisites that must exist for an insurgency to be successful. The first is a vulnerable population. The second is a leadership element that can direct the frustrations of a dissatisfied populace along the lines drawn by the overall insurgent strategy. And the third is a real or perceived lack of government control. The greater control the government has over the situation, the lower the chances for insurgent success. The opposite is also true: the less control the government has, the greater the likelihood of insurgent success.

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Posted on January 23, 2007 in LEO/Mil

usmc

Recently, the USMC released its groundbreaking new "Concept for Functional Fitness."

"The United States Marine Corps has for many years taken pride in the level of physical fitness of its members. Physical fitness has been associated with professional performance, especially performance in combat. This association is correct because combat is the factor that should matter most to a fighting organization. However, the Marine Corps' Physical Fitness Program, as it is currently focused and structured, does not adequately prepare Marines for combat. In fact, other than the inherent ingenuity that some forward-thinking commanders evidence, the focus of the program seems to have only a mediocre combat focus at best. Further, most units find it difficult to follow the program as it stands, but even if the units did, they would still find that their people were insufficiently prepared for the physical rigors of combat.

Marines are athletes. Their preparation for combat is not unlike a collegiate or professional athlete's preparation for his of her sport. There are some key differences of course. Marines do not know the exact game they will be laying and they do not know the climate for the game. They do not know the rules. Marines do not even know when they will be "playing." However, these factors only make preparation more difficult for combat as compared to preparing for a season of sports.

Many of the unknown (and unknowable) factors reinforce an argument that Marines need a general purpose sort of fitness--a fitness that is based on the functions of combat operations. "



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Posted on January 23, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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Intent of the AOF Austere Program
The intent of the Austere AOFP is to provide soldiers with an The intent of the Austere AOFP is to provide soldiers with an operational fitness routine that will produce the required physioperational fitness routine that will produce the required physical, cal, mental, and emotional fitness to be effective in todaymental, and emotional fitness to be effective in today''s s contemporary operating environment. The program is designed contemporary operating environment. The program is designed to be flexible and utilized while in garrison, the field, or depto be flexible and utilized while in garrison, the field, or deployed loyed to austere environments with only common military equipment to austere environments with only common military equipment and readily available local resources (rocks and sand) and readily available local resources (rocks and sand).


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Posted on January 20, 2007 in LEO/Mil

austere

The intent of the Austere AOFP is to provide soldiers with an operational fitness routine that will produce the required physical, mental, and emotional fitness to be effective in today's contemporary operating environment. The program is designed to be flexible and utilized while in garrison, the field, or deployed to austere environments with only common military equipment and readily available local resources (rocks and sand). The purpose of the nine-week program is to maintain or enhance combat fitness, while commercial equipment is not available during deployment or training. The program will provide an effective routine until follow-on equipment, such as Olympic bars and plates, are available. It is designed to be executed "anywhere, anytime". All the required resources can be procured in theatre or easily packed into a couple of barrack boxes and deployed with the unit.


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Posted on January 20, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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Introduction
The organization and format of this article may be confusing for some; it may appear to be written in a foreign language. However, to others--namely, military officers and senior non-commissioned officers--it will be instantly familiar and comprehended. "The Grinder" is produced following the NATO operations order format. An operations order (OPORD or Op O) is a directive issued by a commander to his subordinates in order to effect the coordinated execution of a specific operation (Ranger Handbook, SH 21-76). For this article, the operation or task is a group workout.

The five-paragraph NATO OPORD format, and annexes, are used to organize the commander's direction, to ensure a common operating picture, and to assist subordinate leaders in fully understanding the commander's intent and what results he wants the operation to produce--the end state. It is a logical, clear, and concise method of conveying a plan. The five standard paragraphs that make up the OPORD are: SITUATION, MISSION, EXECUTION, SERVICE SUPPORT, and COMMAND AND SIGNAL.

Because the CrossFit Journal is read by a wide range of military units in the United States and around the world, terms from the NATO glossary of abbreviations, AAP-15(2006), are used whenever possible to clarify directions. The primary audience for "The Grinder" is the military and law enforcement community. However, any agency conducting group physical training will find the content useful, once they get used to the format.

For an OPORD to be effective, it must 1) be constructed so that personnel understand the intent, their own tasks, and the context of those tasks; 2) inform personnel what effect they are to achieve and why it needs to be achieved (for the "Grinder", it is to achieve unit cohesion and combat fitness under fatigue conditions); 3) identify the resources required to execute the task; and 4) impose a minimum of control measures to ensure freedom of action and flexibility.

"The Grinder" is a direct result of the requests generated by last month's CFJ article "Large-Group CrossFit Training" for additional articles addressing platoon and squad combat fitness training.

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Posted on January 13, 2007 in LEO/Mil

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I’ve been training and teaching martial arts and combatives since 1967. During a career that has now spanned 30+ years as student, athlete, instructor, and coach, I’ve been exposed to a variety of conditioning and training advice. I’ve worked with every type of student, from children to soldiers and everyone in between. Before I delve into the heart of “combat calisthenics,” let me offer a disclaimer: This article is not intended to criticize or condemn any form of exercise. In a nation plagued with laziness and obesity, I respect, admire, and support anyone who is working out. But that doesn’t mean that every training regimen produces equal results or exploits every resource it can. At the end of the day, performance is paramount. In fact, performance is everything.

On game day, we all want to win. This applies to a recreational game of tennis, a chase, a battle, or a street fight. But to improve your chances of winning, your training regimen must provide a balance between conditioning your mind and conditioning your body and between general physical preparedness and skill-specific training for your “event.” Your fitness routine must suit your event.

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Posted on October 3, 2006 in LEO/Mil


CrossFit’s work enhancing sport performance, while exciting and even gratifying, sometimes feels too much like helping adults play children’s games. On the other hand, our work with seniors and little kids, while very rewarding, lacks the excitement surrounding elite human performance.

Our recent work and acceptance in the law enforcement, tactical operations, and military special operations communities has been both extremely gratifying and very exciting.

Increasingly, our readers are coming from the ranks of the professional combatant. They have come to CrossFit aware of the reality that, on average, the fitness challenges with which they are most likely to be faced will not be best met by a specialized, narrowly focused fitness. That is the sole domain of the sport athlete.

Incredibly, the fitness needs of professional combatants, police and military, have not been given the same quality analysis, commitment, or even funding that is generally given to sport.

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Category Archives
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CrossFit

» What is CrossFit?, by Greg Glassman - March 04
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» The Business of Guerilla Fitness, by Doug Chapman - March 07
» Interview: Coach Greg Glassman, by Greg Glassman - March 03
» Ergometer Scores and Hall of Fame Workouts, by Greg Glassman - December 02
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» Tabata My Job, by Joshua Newman - November 05
» Theoretical Template for CrossFit's Programming, by Greg Glassman - February 03
» Forging Mental Fitness, by Jim Decker - November 06
» Evidence-Based Fitness Discussion, by Greg Glassman, et al. - January 07
» On Being a Trainer, by Greg Glassman - August 07

CrossFit Games

» Reading Between the Lines, by Dave Castro - August 07

Equipment

» The Garage Gym, by Greg Glassman - September 02
» Garage Gym II: The Revolution, by Greg Glassman - July 05
» Strategic Shopping: Outfitting a CF Gym on the Cheap, by Eddie Lugo - June 06
» Personal Equipment, by Mark Rippetoe - October 06
» Plyo Boxes, by Lincoln Brigham - September 06
» Two Training Aids, by Greg Glassman - September 03
» Really Cool Homemade Parallettes, by Greg Glassman - September 03
» History and Use of Stall Bars, by Larry Harmsen - April 06

Exercises

» The Muscle-up, by Greg Glassman - November 02
» The Overhead Lifts, by Greg Glassman - January 03
» The Pullup, by Greg Glassman - April 03
» Three Important Ab Exercises, by Greg Glassman - May 03
» The Slow Lifts: Bench Press, by Mark Rippetoe - June 06
» The Power Clean, by Mark Rippetoe - August 06
» Medicine Ball Cleans, by Greg Glassman - September 04
» The Kettlebell Swing, by Greg Glassman - September 04
» The Slow Lifts, by Mark Rippetoe - March 06
» The Dumbbell Lunge, by Mike Rutherford - October 06
» Suitcase Deadlift Dumbbell Style, by Mike Rutherford - March 07
» Calisthenics, by Roger Harrell - May 06
» The Push-up, by Greg Glassman - March 03
» The Odd Lifts, by Greg Glassman - January 03
» The Clean, by Greg Glassman - July 03
» The Glute-Ham Developer Situp, by Greg Glassman - October 05
» Kipping Pullups, by Greg Glassman - April 05
» Functionality and Wallball, by Greg Glassman - August 03
» The Deadlift, by Greg Glassman - August 03
» Swingers and Kippers, by Tyler Hass - April 05
» Dumbbell Vertical Press, by Mike Rutherford - January 07
» On the Safety and Efficacy of Overhead Lifting, by Rippetoe, Kilgore, Starrett, et. al - March 08
» The Dumbbell Bear, by Mike Rutherford - June 07

ExPhysiology

» Metabolic Conditioning, by Greg Glassman - June 03
» Metabolic Conditioning Glossary, by Pukie & Greg Glassman - June 03
» Putting Out Fires, by Lon Kilgore - March 07
» What About Recovery?, by Greg Glassman - January 05
» An Aerobic Paradox, by Lon Kilgore - December 06
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Gymnastics/Tumbling

» The Back Handspring, by Roger Harrell - July 06
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» Gymnastics & Tumbling, by Greg Glassman - February 05
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» The Handstand, by Greg Glassman - January 04
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» Gymnastics Hurdle, by Roger Harrell - November 06
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Kettlebells

» Kettlebell Clean, by Jeff Martone - March 07
» Kettlebell Basics: Drills for Improving Your Swing, by Jeff Martone - November 06
» Improving Your Swing Part 2, by Jeff Martone - December 06
» One-Arm Swings and Beyond, by Jeff Martone - January 07
» Kettlebell Clean Combinations, by Jeff Martone - April 07
» A Performance-Based Comparison of Kettlebell Methods, by Steve Cotter - July 07
» The Turkish Get-up Part 1, by Jeff Martone - May 07
» The Turkish Get-up Part 2, by Jeff Martone - June 07
» Swingers and Kippers, by Tyler Hass - April 05

LEO/Mil

» Police Training, by Greg Glassman - March 03
» Combat Calisthenics, by Tony Blauer - July 06
» The Grinder: CrossFit Operations Order #1 "CHAD", by Greg Glassman - July 06
» The AOFP CrossFit Austere Program, by Greg Glassman, Wade Rutland, JT Williams - August 06
» Canadian Infantry School Austere AOFP Program Results Briefing, by Wade Rutland, JT Williams, Jeff Bird - August 06
» A Concept for Functional Fitness, by USMC - January 07
» The CrossFit Insurgency, by Scott Satterlee - July 06
» CrossFit, Stoicism, and an American Prisoner of War, by Andrew Thompson - December 04
» Monster Mash, by Capt Andrew Thompson, November 04
» Training in Austere Locations, by James Decker - March 06
» The Grinder: CrossFit FRAGO #8, "SHANE", by Greg Glassman - March 07

Medical/Injuries

» Working Wounded, by Greg Glassman - May 05
» CrossFit Shoulder Therapy, by Tyler Hass - October 05
» CrossFit Induced Rhabdo, by Greg Glassman - October 05
» Trigger Point Therapy, by Christian Lemburg - September 05
» On Recovery, by Robb Wolf - January 05
» The Yin and Yang of the Back, by Michael Rutherford - December 06

MMA

» The Triangle, by Becca Borawski - November 06
» The Left Hook, by Becca Borawski - March 07
» McCarthy's Ultimate Training Academy, by Becca Borawski - January 07
» CrossPit Basics, by Tony Budding - April 06
» Fight Camp, by Becca Borawski - December 06
» Surviving in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, by Becca Borawski - April 08

Nutrition

» Glycemic Index, by Greg Glassman - November 02
» Fast Food, by Greg Glassman - December 02
» Fit to Eat: Pick of Summer Dinner, by Benjamin Sims - August 06
» Getting off the Crack, by Nicole Carroll - October 05
» Fit to Eat: Spring Dinner Menu, by Benjamin Sims - May 06
» Fit to Eat: Summer Picnic Menu, by Benjamin Sims - June 06
» Fit to Eat: Spicy Summer Barbeque, by Benjamin Sims - July 06
» Fit to Eat: Autumn Dinner, by Benjamin Sims - October 06
» CFJ Issue 21: Zone Meal Plans - May 04
» CFJ Issue 15: Nutrition -Avoiding Metabolic Derangement - November 03

Olympic Lifts

» Learning the Olympic Lifts: The Stance, by Mike Burgener & Tony Budding - November 06
» Pulling Positions for the Snatch, Mike Burgener with Tony Budding - March 07
» Skill Transfer Exercises, by Tony Budding - May 06
» The Scoop & The Second Pull, by Greg Glassman, January 06
» The Burgener Warmup, by Mike Burgener & Tony Budding - January 07

Parkour

» Parkour Basics: A Compendium, by Jesse Woody - November 06
» Tic-Tac & Wall Run, by Jesse Woody - August 06
» Parkour Part 3: Jumping, by Jesse Woody - July 06
» Parkour, by Jesse Woody - March 06
» Underbar and Gate Vault, by Jesse Woody, October 06
» Parkour Basics Part 1, by Jesse Woody - May 06
» Basics of Parkour: Environmental Awareness and the Roll, by Jesse Woody - April 06

Powerlifting

» A New, Rather Long Analysis of the Deadlift, by Mark Rippetoe - November 06
» CrossFit & Powerlifting, by Jason Bagwell - May 05
» Popular Biomechanics, by Mark Rippetoe - March 07
» Slow Lifts 5: The Deadlift, by Mark Rippetoe, -July 06
» The Deadlift, by Greg Glassman - August 03
» The Slow Lifts 2: The Squat, by Mark Rippetoe - April 06

Premium

» On Being a Trainer, by Greg Glassman - August 07

Rest Day/Theory

» Science and the Rest Day Discussions, by Jeff Glassman - November 07

Rowing

» Strategies for a 7 Minute 2K on the Concept II Rower, by Greg Glassman - November 02
» Rowing Technique, by Angela Hart - October 06
» What's Your Power IQ, by Angela Hart - December 06
» Using Erg Data to Fine-Tune Your Training, by Judy Geer - March 07
» Rowing Workouts, by Angela Hart - May 07
» Row Fast: How to Prepare for an Erg Test, by Peter Dreissigacker - February 07
» Indoor Rowing: Damper Settings & Intensity, by Peter Dreissigacker - April 07
» Ergometer Scores and Hall of Fame Workouts, by Greg Glassman - December 02

Special Populations

» A CrossFit Grandma, by Mary Conover - October 04
» "The Girls" for Grandmas!, by Greg Glassman - October 04
» High School Phys Ed., by Tony Budding - October 04

Sports Applications

» UC Riverside Baseball Fall Conditioning, by Josh Everett - February 07
» Why Swimming is Different, by Terry Laughlin - March 05
» Slacklining, by Michael Street - November 04
» Bike Control Basics: Static Skills, by Scott Hagnas - October 06
» Inside-Out Breathing, by Terry Laughlin - December 05
» Speed Development, by Karl Geissler & John Baumann - March 06
» U.C. Riverside Women’s Basketball Off Season Conditioning, by Josh Everett - March 07
» Recovery and Regeneration Interview with Carl Valle, by Tyler Hass - January 05
» Swingers and Kippers, by Tyler Hass - April 05
» CrossFit to Go, by Lindsay Yaw - June 05
» Bike Control Basics Part 3, by Scott Hagnas - December 06
» Hooverball, by Greg Glassman - February 03

Videos

» Science and the Rest Day Discussions, by Jeff Glassman - November 07
» On Being a Trainer, by Greg Glassman - August 07

Workouts

» The CrossFit Total, by Mark Rippetoe - December 06
» Interval Generator, by Greg Glassman - June 03
» Fooling Around With Fran, by Greg Glassman - March 05
» The New Girls, by Greg Glassman - November 04
» Ergometer Scores and Hall of Fame Workouts, by Greg Glassman - December 02
» Benchmark Workouts, by Greg Glassman - September 03
» "The Girls" for Grandmas!, by Greg Glassman - October 04
» Team Workouts, by Greg Glassman - October 03




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