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Category: ExPhysiology

Posted on July 18, 2008 in ExPhysiology


1203Anatomy.png

Effective coaching requires efficient communication. This communication is greatly aided by coach and athlete sharing a terminology for both human movement and body parts.

We've developed an exceedingly simple lesson in anatomy and physiology that we believe has improved our ability to accurately and precisely motivate desired behaviors and enhanced our athletes' understanding of both movement and posture.

Basically, we ask that our athletes learn four body parts, three joints (not including the spine), and two general directions for joint movement. We cap our A&P lesson with the essence of sports biomechanics distilled to three simple rules.

We use a simple iconography to depict the spine, pelvis, femur, and tibia. We show that the spine has a normal "S" shape and where it is on the athlete's body. We similarly demonstrate the pelvis, femur, and tibia.

We next demonstrate the motion of three joints. First, the knee is the joint connecting tibia and femur. Second, working our way up, is the hip. The hip is the joint that connects the femur to the pelvis. Third, is the sacroiliac joint (SI joint), which connects the pelvis to the spine. (We additionally make the point that the spine is really a whole bunch of joints.)

We explain that the femur and tibia constitute "the leg" and that the pelvis and spine constitute "the trunk." That completes our anatomy lesson - now for the physiology. We demonstrate that "flexion" is reducing the angle of a joint and that "extension" is increasing the angle of a joint.


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Posted on December 10, 2007 in ExPhysiology

paradox

Have you ever thought about what it is exactly that drives improvement in aerobic work capacity? If you are like most people you probably haven’t really felt compelled to ponder this. Even though I am trained pretty extensively in cardiovascular physiology and training theory, I am an anaerobe and a musclehead. What makes muscle work, become stronger, bigger, or more powerful is my interest.

That means that I hadn't, until recently, considered the question either. In fact, if I had been asked that question two years ago, I probably would have pulled an answer out of some old aerobic dogma buried in my brain somewhere, obtained from reading texts and research journals or from sitting in a lecture hall somewhere. I accepted fairly unquestioningly (albeit with a few exceptions in programming issues) the conventional wisdom of aerobic training physiology. I was a happy camper. I didn’t know I actually cared about a higher level of understanding pertaining to aerobic fitness.

This entire article is available in the CrossFit Store.

Posted on September 25, 2007 in ExPhysiology

recovery

For the record, my bad attitude towards any established corpus of recovery information stems from several quirks of my intellectual temperament and the nature of my clinical practice. It has been my professional experience that successful training protocols present themselves over time through superior performance among their adherents.

Repeatedly over my career exceptional performance has been easily and quickly rooted out and attributed to the particulars of the performer’s training regimen. A natural process of question and answer mines more potent strategies quickly: "Where does this guy come from; he learns so quickly?" "He’s a gymnast." "Why are these guys so much stronger than the others?" "They powerflifted for years." How did she get so lean so quickly? "By cutting her intake of high glycemic carbohydrate."

By watching, learning, asking, and experimenting we have been able to build a successful program whose methods were harvested entirely from elite performers. I want to ask, someday, "Who are those amazing athletes?" to which the answer comes, "the new resters."

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Posted on June 24, 2007 in ExPhysiology


fireman

Honolulu Fire Department, Hawaii; Orange Country Fire Authority and Oakland Fire Department, California; Woodinville Fire and Life Safety District, Washington; Marietta Fire Department, Georgia; Parker Fire District, Colorado. What do all of these fire departments have in common?

You’ve probably already guessed part of the answer: They use CrossFit, officially or unofficially, to prepare for the rigors of their profession. But there’s more. In firefighter competitions around the country, it seems that whenever CrossFit-trained personnel enter, they end up at the top of the field. We might even say that fire companies like those above dominate the competition.

For those of us familiar with CrossFit and its results, this success is not terribly surprising. However, we have observed a phenomenon in these competitions that is curious indeed. In the parts of the competitions that require contestants to use oxygen tanks, CrossFit-trained firefighters consumed less from their oxygen bottles than other competitors. At first this seems odd—winners using less oxygen? The conventional understanding is that the more fit you are, the more oxygen you can consume (i.e., the greater your VO2 max), the higher levels of exertion you can sustain, and the faster you can get the job done.

This entire article is available in the CrossFit Store.

Posted on June 16, 2007 in Basics | ExPhysiology

pukieterms

V02 max: Maximum amount of oxygen that can be used continuously divided by body mass. Long the gold standard of aerobic fitness, the slight advantage that endurance athletes have over anaerobic athletes in V02 max can be attributable to the low body mass of endurance
athletes. I can use a similar definition of strength – by dividing lifts by weight - to show that little guys are stronger than big guys.

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Posted on December 22, 2006 in ExPhysiology

Jun03Metcon.jpg

Introduction
In the second issue of CrossFit Journal, “What is Fitness?” we explored the nature of metabolic conditioning, or “cardio,” and highlighted some of the qualities of and distinctions between aerobic and anaerobic exercise, and touched on interval training. In this issue we’ll reexamine metabolic and interval training in a little more detail.

Review
Let’s begin with a review of metabolic training. Metabolic training refers to conditioning exercises intended to ncrease the storage and delivery of energy for any activity. There are three distinct biochemical means by which energy is provided for all human action. These “metabolic engines” are known as the phosphagen pathway, the glycolytic pathway, and the oxidative pathway.

The first, the phosphagen pathway, provides the bulk of energy used in highest-powered activities, those that last less than ten seconds.

The second, the glycolytic pathway, dominates moderate-powered activities, those that last up to several minutes.

The third, the oxidative pathway provides energy for low-powered activities, those that last in excess of several minutes.

This entire article is available in the CrossFit Store.

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ExPhysiology

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MMA

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Nutrition

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Olympic Lifts

» Learning the Olympic Lifts: The Stance, by Mike Burgener & Tony Budding - November 06
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Parkour

» Parkour Basics: A Compendium, by Jesse Woody - November 06
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» A New, Rather Long Analysis of the Deadlift, by Mark Rippetoe - November 06
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» The Deadlift, by Greg Glassman - August 03
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Premium

» On Being a Trainer, by Greg Glassman - August 07

Rest Day/Theory

» Science and the Rest Day Discussions, by Jeff Glassman - November 07

Rowing

» Strategies for a 7 Minute 2K on the Concept II Rower, by Greg Glassman - November 02
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» What's Your Power IQ, by Angela Hart - December 06
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» Row Fast: How to Prepare for an Erg Test, by Peter Dreissigacker - February 07
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» A CrossFit Grandma, by Mary Conover - October 04
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Sports Applications

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» Bike Control Basics Part 3, by Scott Hagnas - December 06
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Videos

» Science and the Rest Day Discussions, by Jeff Glassman - November 07
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Workouts

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» Interval Generator, by Greg Glassman - June 03
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