Workout of the day

0

Rest Day

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ICREPS

Five years ago, Richard Beddie, Chairman of the International Confederation of Exercise Professionals (ICREPS), made false statements regarding CrossFit, Inc. and its affiliates in an article published in the health section of a popular New Zealand magazine. He then attempted to convince CrossFit, Inc. and its thousands of trainers to pay registration fees to his organization. CrossFit refused and sued. On March 20, 2019, Beddie admitted that he had no evidence to back up his allegations against CrossFit and issued a formal apology.

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The fourth workout of the 2019 Reebok CrossFit Games Open featured two couplets separated by a mandatory 3-minute rest. The first part was 3 rounds of 10 snatches and 12 bar-facing burpees. The second was 3 rounds of 10 bar muscle-ups and 12 bar-facing burpees. The time cap was 12 minutes, including the rest. This was the second week athletes were asked to perform a high-skill movement, and once against athletes worldwide rose to the occasion. Looking at all versions of the workout that required bar muscle-ups, there were 99,924 men and 25,327 women in total who successfully performed at least one bar muscle-up before the time cap in 19.4.

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Workout of the day

50

Power clean 5-3-3-1-1-1 reps.

Practice the L-sit for 10 minutes.

Practice front and back scales for 10 minutes.

Post loads to comments.

The Power Clean

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Hyponatremia

The third post in Professor Tim Noakes’ hyponatremia series continues to review the influential Wyndham and Strydom heatstroke study and evaluates its various levels of scientific evidence. Noakes also presents a scale for grading the relative validity of different experimental designs.

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Workout of the day

92

For time:

Row 500 meters
21 thrusters
Row 1,000 meters
15 thrusters
Row 500 meters
21 thrusters

Men: 135 lb.
Women: 95 lb.

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At-Home Workout

1
At-Home Workout

Bent-over rows and push-ups

Watch

Dr. Nortin Hadler, emeritus professor of medicine and microbiology/immunology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and former attending rheumatologist at UNC Hospitals, reviews the AstraZeneca-funded JUPITER trial of Crestor (the pharma company’s statin or cholesterol-lowering drug), particularly its claim that there is “unequivocal evidence” of the drug’s effectiveness. In this 2008 article, Hadler concludes, “I'd have to treat a hundred or more people with Crestor for a year to spare one of them a cardiovascular event that they would not have otherwise had. I'd have to treat several hundred for a year to spare one a heart attack, and perhaps hundreds more to spare one a stroke. I am unwilling to even suggest a life-saving benefit. …the reduction of 56 percent may be hard to ignore, but it calls for reflection rather than prescribing zeal. It is a reduction in a very small outcome to an even smaller outcome.”

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Workout of the day

86

3 rounds for max reps of:

Body-weight bench presses
Strict pull-ups

Post reps completed to comments.

Khan Academy

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The highly influential JUPITER trial (2008) considered the impact of rosuvastatin, commonly known as Crestor, on heart disease risk. Over two years, Crestor dramatically decreased cholesterol levels and total cardiovascular events. However, the trial was and remains controversial because it was stopped early (which may have exaggerated its effects), showed a significant increase in diabetes in the treatment group, and involved multiple conflicts of interest.

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