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“The needs of our olympic athletes and grandparents differ by degree, not kind.” That is to say, everyone needs to perform an intelligently selected variety of functional movements at a level of intensity appropriate for that individual. Everyone needs to eat food that sustains, rather than harms, the body. This is the pursuit of fitness, and the ability to maintain that fitness throughout your life is a defining measure of health. CrossFit At Home is a place to access the necessary tools—functional movement, simple nourishment—to sustain and preserve your health at home.

the atlantic

“Although industrial processing strips food of much of its natural vitamin content, manufacturers can add synthetic vitamins back in—and promptly start advertising everything from doughnuts to beer as filled with the ingredients essential for health. Today, celebrities swear by the miraculous powers of vitamin mega-doses, and more than half of Americans take a dietary supplement every day. But where do all these synthetic vitamins come from—and are they actually doing us any good?”

Read MoreHow Vitamins Enabled America’s Processed-Food Revolution
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“Millions of Americans use dietary supplements and a variety of diets to protect their heart health. But a large new analysis found that there was strikingly little proof from rigorous studies that supplements and some widely recommended diets have the power to prevent heart disease. The findings are likely to elicit controversy and continued debate. But the researchers said one clear message from their analysis was that the more than half of Americans who use dietary supplements should be wary of claims that multivitamins and other supplements will improve their heart health. …When [the authors] looked at various diets recommended for cardiovascular prevention, they found a similar lack of solid evidence. That was certainly the case for low-fat diets, which health authorities have recommended for decades as a way to lower cholesterol and heart disease risk. ...the most rigorous randomized trials provided no evidence that eating less fat, including saturated fat, had an impact on mortality or cardiovascular outcomes.”

Read the article Supplements and diets for heart health show limited proof of benefit
reuters

“The only liver disease becoming more widespread in the U.S. is one driven by obesity and diabetes, even as other types of liver disorders linked to drinking or hepatitis are becoming less common, researchers say. For the study, researchers examined nationwide health survey data collected in five cycles between 1988 and 2016. Over this period, the proportion of adults with what’s known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rose from 20% to 28.3%, mirroring increases in rates of obesity and diabetes over the same period.”

Read the article Liver disease related to obesity and diabetes rising in U.S.

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