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“The needs of our olympic athletes and grandparents differ by degree, not kind.” That is to say, everyone needs to perform an intelligently selected variety of functional movements at a level of intensity appropriate for that individual. Everyone needs to eat food that sustains, rather than harms, the body. This is the pursuit of fitness, and the ability to maintain that fitness throughout your life is a defining measure of health. CrossFit At Home is a place to access the necessary tools—functional movement, simple nourishment—to sustain and preserve your health at home.

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In this 2012 article, Gary Taubes and Cristin Kearns Couzens review the history of the sugar industry’s attempts to dismiss or conceal the troubling health claims linking their products to rising rates of diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic diseases. In a “decades-long effort to stack the scientific deck,” the Sugar Association, its spin-off International Sugar Research Foundation, and “contributing research members” from companies such as Coca-Cola, Hershey’s, and Nabisco poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into research grants and studies designed, as internal documents put it, “to maintain research as a main prop of the industry’s defense.” As the authors describe, these efforts — and an extensive series of public relations campaigns — rewarded the sugar industry with a profound degree of influence over nutrition guidelines, the official recommendations of groups such as the American Diabetes Association, and the general public’s understanding of nutrition.

Read the article Big Sugar's Sweet Little Lies
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“Kellogg, one of the county’s top cereal companies, has agreed to stop using misleading terms such as ‘healthy,’ ‘nutritious,’ and ‘wholesome’ to promote products like Frosted Mini-Wheats. On October 21, 2019, the Battle Creek, Michigan-based corporation, officially known as The Kellogg Company, entered into a settlement agreement with a class of five plaintiffs in California and New York, who alleged Kellogg used deceptive health and wellness claims to market high-sugar cereals and breakfast bars. … The company can no longer advertise certain products, where added sugars represent at least 10 percent of calories, as ‘healthy.’ Nor can it promote them with phrases like ‘start with a healthy spoonful’ or ‘invest in your health.’”

Read the article Kellogg agrees to stop marketing sugary cereals as “healthy”

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